My Trenton Times Article on Beauties, Blessings of Prolonged Cold

Opinion: A long, cold winter reveals its beauty

Fox on ice Millstone Aqueduct Brenda Jones DX1_3291.jpg
Red fox running across frozen Lake Carnegie in Princeton, February 2009 (Brenda Jones, photographer)

Times of Trenton guest opinion columnBy Times of Trenton guest opinion column
on February 24, 2015 at 8:00 AM, updated February 24, 2015 at 8:40 AM

By Carolyn Foote Edelmann

Friends and I have decided that an effective way to endure prolonged, serious cold is to begin a list of its benefits. Perhaps Times readers would like to try such a list and send in their suggestions.

I rejoice in the seamless cold because of new beauties that are revealed by its presence — everywhere, at all hours of the day and night. When skies are clear and gelid, starlight is blinding. The new moon and Venus have never looked more ravishing than while winking over endless snowfields on the outskirts of Pennington.

However, my No. 1 reason to be thankful is that sustained cold kills the microbes that cause mange in fox dens and, therefore, in foxes. This has been a serious problem at Island Beach State Park. Humans ignored multiple posted warnings not to feed the foxes. This practice teaches foxes to look to humans for food. It accustoms foxes to carbohydrates, when they are truly carnivores and require both the protein and the fat of their classic prey, mostly mice and voles. Human food lowers vulpine resistance to disease. If their dens are not sterilized by cold, the animals suffer enormously, losing their glorious fur and even their tails, and then they perish.

Prolonged cold alters the fate of foxes for the better. When it’s below freezing for several days, mange is banished from the foxes’ dens.

In addition, when Barnegat and Raritan Bays freeze, new, healthy foxes scamper across from the mainland, bringing vibrant strains to populations we have harmed by feeding what should never be tamed.

Being very much on the side of wild creatures, this long cold of ours makes me wonder if it might also help coyotes increase their territory. I live near the Pole Farm, in Lawrence. I have seen coyote scat there, right where it belongs, in the middle of trails. But I have yet to be blessed by an encounter with this four-legged wonder. Hiking the Pole Farm right now is like trying to navigate the rugged terrain of Italyy’s Carrara marble quarry, –that is, almost impossible.  I cannot answer my coyote question.

Cold bestows another blessing. If it weren’t for snowfall after snowfall, I would not know that a fox visits my dwelling. There are straight, determined paths of tiny rose-like paw prints, one after another, that lead right up to the shrubs below my study window. So long as snow persists, fox signatures remain, right here.

Working as I do with the D & R Greenway Land Trust, preservation of habitat and creatures is paramount in my life. It is easy to become discouraged about both in this over-peopled 21st century. These cold blessings lift my heart.

I’m not saying that catastrophic climate change, including the cold weather we have been enduring lately, is good. I am proposing that there are miracles revealed by cold and snow of which we never otherwise would have a clue.

Carolyn Foote Edelmann, a poet, naturalist and community relations associate for the D and R Greenway Land Trust, writes and photographs for NJWildBeauty nature blog (njwildbeauty.wordpress.com).

RARITAN RIVER TALK AT DandR GREENWAY Feb. 26 with Judy Auer Shaw, Ph.D.

Thursday, February 26th, everyone who loves the Raritan River and its exquisite and storied canal may hear Judy Auer Shaw, Ph.D., at D&R Greenway Land Trust, on the river’s history, industrial importance, aesthetic value, importance to our water supply, and current perils.  Dr. Shaw is a legend in her time, on many fronts.  Her current passion is this river, and her life is devoted to preserving and improving. it.

AuerShawinKayakImageforRaritanRiverPresentationbySchultz

Dr. Judy Shaw, The Raritan’s River-keeper

The presentation is from 6:30 to 8 p.m., with a light reception.  To register for this free evening of information and delight, please use rsvp@drgreenway.org.  Dr. Shaw’s book will be for sale and she will sign copies that night.

Cover, Judy Auer's new Book, "The Raritan River, Our Landscape, Our Legacy"

Cover, Judy Auer’s new Book, “The Raritan River, Our Landscape, Our Legacy”

The Delaware and Raritan Canal was created in the 1830’s to carry coal from Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley safely to New York (by Raritan Bay) and Philadelphia (via Delaware Bay.)  The pre-canal route meant rounding Cape May and daring dangerous shoals, en route to and past Sandy Hook.  At one time our canal carried more tonnage than the legendary Erie!

D&R Canal north of Mapleton Fishing Bridge by Carolyn Edelmann

D&R Canal north of Mapleton Fishing Bridge by Carolyn Edelmann

The Raritan River begins at the confluence of the North and South Branches of the Raritan.  All along that waterway, wildlife should be able to thrive.  Dr. Shaw is doing everything in her power to see to it that the River’s natural benefits to are region are restored and enhanced.

Great Blue Heron near Carnegie Lake Dam by Tasha O'Neill

Great Blue Heron near Carnegie Lake Dam by Tasha O’Neill

Beaver Lodge along D&R Canal Above Mapleton Fishing Bridge by Carolyn Edelmann

Beaver Lodge along D&R Canal Above Mapleton Fishing Bridge by Carolyn Edelmann

Snake Swims D&R Canal near Princeton

Snake Swims D&R Canal near Princeton

The North Branch of the Raritan is one of the most exquisite features of the state of New Jersey.  Up near Califon and Clinton, it ripples, clear as gin, over time-smoothed rocks, hiding and nourishing trout.

Ken Lockwood Gorge is astounding for hikers as well as trout fishermen.  My friend Tasha O’Neill is famous for realistic and abstract images of the Gorge.  To walk there is to move well beyond the 21st Century, in fact back to the time of the Lenni Lenapes/Algonquins who fished these shores long before we did.

Quintessential Trout Fisherman, Ken Lockwood Gorge, by Tasha O'Neill

Quintessential Trout Fisherman, Ken Lockwood Gorge, by Tasha O’Neill

Trout Fisherman Succeeds in Ken Lockwood Gorge, by Tasha O'Neill

Trout Fisherman Succeeds in Ken Lockwood Gorge, by Tasha O’Neill

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The sheer beauty and vibrancy of trout in the Raritan at its source – by Tasha O’Neill

Autumn Palette Ken Lockwood Gorge, Tasha O'Neill

My Ordinary Scene of Ken Lockwood in Autumn

Even if you have known the Raritan, as I did, –having lived above it in New Brunswick, you may find these images  hard to believe.  But they may explain, partially, why I’ve been in love with the Raritan since I met that river in 1964.  At the time, I knew nothing of the Raritan’s history, had never heard of Lenni Lenapes, and didn’t even realize that was a canal down there!

Autumn Spill along the Aqueduct of the D&R Canal at the Mapleton Bridge Near Princeton, by Carolyn Edelmann

Autumn Spill along the Aqueduct of the D&R Canal at the Mapleton Bridge Near Princeton, by Carolyn Edelmann

North Branch of the Raritan, Ken Lockwood Gorge, by Anne Zeman

North Branch of the Raritan, Ken Lockwood Gorge, by Anne Zeman

I walk the Gorge with many friends — the above is Anne Zeman’s dreamy view of the Raritan in all its pristine beauty.

North Branch of the Raritan, Ken Lockwood Gorge, by Tasha O'Neill

North Branch of the Raritan, Ken Lockwood Gorge, by Tasha O’Neill

We moved into the tall apartment (Colony House, first Buccleuch Park Towers) at Landing Lane Bridge in New Brunswick.  Our apartment wrapped around the corner, so we woke to the Raritan, and supped in its sunset.  The river was frequently mist-covered.  Sunrise would tint dawn’s mist pink, and sunset tended to fill the rivermist with coralline hues.  My daughters, toddlers, would wake from naps, rushing to see “The boys in the boats on the reevah.”

People who’d always lived in New Brunswick would stride into our apartment and say, “Well, Carolyn, it’s beautiful, but it’s not New Brunswick.”  I didn’t know enough then to tell them that the Raritan is far more important than New Brunswick!

Never would I have believed anyone who would insist that I’d be living near that river and its canal for most of the rest of my life.  That the Towpath would inspire, nourish, even heal me through almost overwhelming tragedies.  That a friend would teach me to kayak on the canal above Griggstown. That the Raritan River and its Canal create a feast for all seasons.

peaceful prow D&R canal tasha o neill

Peaceful Prow on D&R Canal near Princeton, by Tasha O’Neill

"In Just Spring" along the D&R Canal Towpath north of Princeton

“In Just Spring” along the D&R Canal Towpath north of Princeton

autumnthe-midas-touch-carnegie-dock-cfe-300x225

Autumn Harvest, D&R Canal Style, near Princeton

Red Mill, Carnegie Lake by Tasha O'Neill

Red Mill, Carnegie Lake by Tasha O’Neill

SNOWBOUND — REMEMBERING THE MARSH, — A Winter Walk

Not all winters tie one to the house!.  Some draw you outside, inexorably, delightedly.

Here are some rare but typical scenes of what used to be the Hamilton/Trenton/Bordentown Marsh, now the Abbott Marshlands.

Come wander with me, no matter the weather.  Come relish New Jersey’s wild beauty.

Marsh Weeds in Spring Lake

Marsh Weeds in Spring Lake

The Lake was purportedly named by Indians because formed by an ever-renewing spring.

Marsh Frozen Spring Lake Winter 2014

Spring Lake Mostly Frozen — But Life Exists Herein

Marsh First Willows 2013

The Wonder of Willows, Marsh

Marsh, Where Muskrats Ramble

Where Muskrats Ramble, Near Spring Lake

NJWILDBEAUTY Readers know I have an enormous need to see either New Jersey’s wild creatures, or evidence of their presence, or both.

Beaver Lodge, Marsh -- in winter, beaver keep waters open for rare ducks

Beaver Lodge, Marsh — in winter, beaver keep waters open for rare ducks

Beaver Fppd

Beaver Food

Goose Trails, Spring Lake

Goose Trails, Spring Lake

Marsh Sandy Damage 2013

Eponymous Beech Tree, Damaged by Hurricane Sandy

Fallen Trunk Decorated with Fungus, Marsh

Fallen Trunk Decorated with Fungus, Marsh

Turkey Tail Fungus on Felled Trunk, Marsh

Turkey Tail Fungus on Felled Trunk, Marsh

This winter walk was taken with Town Topics writer par excellence, Linda Arntzenius.  Sometimes the iced trail was so narrow that only one boot at a time could make its way.  Hardly ever could we walk side-by-side, but what beauty was ours!

And such silence!  Sacred soundlessness — how very rare in the modern world.

Beavers' Midnight Snack

Beavers’ Midnight Snack

Where Turtles Lurk and Thrive

Where Turtles Lurk and Thrive

In season, one learns to seek tiny dark triangles in spring lake, triangles that move right along, for they are the heads of the lake’s majestic turtles.  Sometimes, also, in the lake, snakes swim.

In winter, walkers can follow the straight trails of foxes, out for a stroll or a hunt, and discover the wing marks of rising birds in fresh snow on downed trunks.

To get to the Marsh, take Route 1 South into Trenton to the South Broad Street exit.  Drive as directed round the arena, and turn left/south onto Broad Street.  After Lalor, which angles only on your right, look for a church with two steeples, followed by a red light at Sewell Avenue.  Turn right onto Sewell and go about five blocks until the road Ts at the Marsh itself.  Drive through the gate and park near the lake. Usually, you will be welcomed by stately swans in all seasons.

To learn the Marsh, check out http://www.marsh-friends.org.  Get onto their e-mail mailing list for hikes with Ornithologist Charlie Leck, Botanist Mary Leck, and Mercer County Naturalist, Jenn Rogers.  In all seasons, these merry experts will introduce you to the creatures who thrive in New Jersey because individuals and groups such as D&R Greenway preserved this freshwater tidal wetlands.

VIBRANT LOCAL FOODS: INDOOR WINTER FARM MARKET, @ D&R GREENWAY lAND TRUST FEB. 14

Winter Farm Market at D&R Greenway, Sat. 2/14   10 a.m. to 2 p.m

 

Organic Treasures, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Organic Treasures, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Local treasures, organic excellence, awaits at the Indoor Winter Farm Markets, sponsored by Slow Food Central Jersey and the managers of the spectacularly successful West Windsor Farm Market, open on Vaughn Drive in the growing season.

NJWILDBEAUTY readers know I work for D&R Greenway Land Trust.  No, we don’t grow food, nor even grapes for wine.  But we have been saving land in New Jersey for 26 years, and farm land increasingly requires our attention and preservation.

One of the joys of my life, as my Packet NJWILD readers and my NJWILDBEAUTY readers know, is farm food, especially when purchased at some rustic site from the people who planted, nourished, tended, harvested, and brought to market these treasures.

Brussels Bounty - Terhune Orchards -- Indoor Winter Farm Market at D&R Greenway

Brussels Bounty – Terhune Orchards — Indoor Winter Farm Market at D&R Greenway

It’s hard for a poet and/or a journalist to admit that a picture is worth 10,000 words.  But it’s true, darn it.

So let these images, from the January Indoor Winter Farm Market at D&R Greenway Land Trust, where I work most days, at One Preservation Place, off Rosedale Road, in Princeton (08540), convince you to attend the one on Valentine’s Day, February 14, from 10 to 2.  The cognoscenti know to arrive close to ten.  Music peals through our 1900 barn, and wondrous information is ours, as shoppers, from the farmer/proprietors/preparers!  You may call us at 609 924 4646 for information beforehand, but the Staff will not be at their desks on Saturday.  You’ll find a number of us, with our sustainable bags, moving from vendor to vendor, choosing the best of the best of the Garden State.

Indoor Winter Farm Market at D&R Greenway - Terhune's Apples

Indoor Winter Farm Market at D&R Greenway – Terhune’s Apples

Divine Mushrooms, D&R Greenway hosts Indoor Winter Farm Market

Divine Mushrooms, D&R Greenway hosts Indoor Winter Farm Market

Des Champignons- Mushroom Feast, Indoor Winter Farm Market at D&R Greenway Land Trust

Des Champignons- Mushroom Feast, Indoor Winter Farm Market at D&R Greenway Land Trust

Mushroom Girl, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Mushroom Girl, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Local Honey -- Immune Booster, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Local Honey — Immune Booster, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Last of the Cranberries from the Pine Barrens, Indoor Winter Farm Market at D&R Greenway Land Trust

Last of the Cranberries from the Pine Barrens, Indoor Winter Farm Market at D&R Greenway Land Trust

Kale Cascade Farm Market DRG Jan 2015

KALE!

Jerry and his rare Cheeses, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Jerry and his rare Cheeses, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Jams by Kim, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Jams by Kim, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

"I say it's Spinach!" - Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

“I say it’s Spinach!” – Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Honey and Beeswax, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Honey and Beeswax, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Handmade Soap, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway

Handmade Soap, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway

Grass-fed Meats, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Grass-fed Meats, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway Land Trust

Vibrant Greens, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway

Vibrant Greens, Indoor Winter Farm Market, D&R Greenway

This is only a sampling, taken at random, with delight, for the January Farm Market.  Did you think foods this alive were available in the heart of winter?  February 14 is Saturday – no better gift for a Valentine than live healthy local foods.  March 1, Slow Food Central Jersey and West Windsor Farm Market folks will bring you these splendors at Tre Piani, Forrestal Village — owned and chefed by Jim Weaver, founder of Slow Food Central Jersey.  March 14 will bring these treasures back to D&R Greenway.

When we save land, as we’ve been doing since 1989, one of our major purpose is to make healthy lifestyles more available and more appealing.

Come to our restored barn, where animals and vegetables fed the family of “The General”, Robert Wood Johnson, while they lived at Morven.  See the magnificent art on our walls, and buy masterpieces for you home.  A percentage of the purchase price supports our preservation and stewardship.  Sign up for our programs on nature, on science, on native plants, on the Raritan River — weave yourself into the health, beauty and sustainability of our region!

And feast, for weeks afterwards, on foods for which city dwellers would ‘give their eye teeth’!  Bobolink Dairy, Cherry Grove Farm, Terhune Orchards, are only a few of the vendors who fill all the art galleries of our barn for these country events.

Besides, It’s Fun!

“Sarah Palin Says It’s All My Fault” and Other Political Poems

American Flag at Stern of the Twilight Steamboat on the Mississippi

American Flag at Stern of the Twilight Steamboat on the Mississippi

When friends and I were furiously fighting with Princeton University to preserve the hallowed Princeton Nursery Lands in Kingston, I lamented to one of them that night, “But I’m a poet!  What am I doing at the barricades?”

The friend brilliantly retorted, “But Carolyn, poets BELONG at the barricades.”

I returned, chastened, to the battle.  Ultimately, we saved a handful of acres, and the Friends of Princeton Nursery Lands was formed and thrives, leading informative trail walks, planting Flemer Nursery trees, sponsoring annual clean-ups, such as the very successful recent one on Martin Luther King Day.  FPNL aims to restore the classic nursery buildings, stalled now by insufficient fundings.  NJWILBEAUTY readers can assist by going onto the FPNL website and donating, and coming to their enriching events.

In the intervening years, in amongst nature poems, which I share with NJWILDBEAUTY readers, I have increasingly written political poems.

My fury over the indifference of politicians to the plight of the planet, results in my deciding to share some of the more radical political poems of recent years with my readers.

“Sarah Palin Says It’s All My Fault” won on-line publication at the time of the Gulf Oil Spill.  Now politicians, including the the President we thought knew better and would prevent profanation of the planet, want to drill for oil off-shore, in already imperiled New Jersey, and also puncture her north, south, east, west and especially the Pine Barrens for the spoils of Fracking!

Do what you can, readers, with your legislators, wherever you live, to arrest despoilation of the Planet.  

Pipeline! Along D&R Canal south of Princeton, Our Historic Bucolic Waterway, Our Water SUPPLY!

Pipeline! Along D&R Canal south of Princeton, Our Historic Bucolic Waterway, Our Water SUPPLY!

Here’s my Sarah Poem.

POETS FOR LIVING WATERS

Creating venues for poetry in support of healthy ocean communities

DEAR SARAH PALIN, by Carolyn Foote Edelmann

Posted on June 21, 2010 by Heidi Lynn Staples

DEAR SARAH PALIN,

I understand it’s all my fault
–this Gulf oil disaster, I mean–
not only all that fire
bodies catapulted into air
then drowned
soon likely shark bait
but also this volcano of oil
spewing interminably
into our blue mantle

Sarah, you say
I did this
all of this and more
now some six weeks ago
with no end in sight
and no businessman
politician not even a general
let alone you, Sarah Palin,
knows how to stop
this tornado of oil

it’s also my fault, the oiled birds
Northern gannets
–pristine as Josephine
in her Empire gown
frail white silk
adorned with gold
though not quite bees
dark eyes snapping
as she becomes increasingly encased
in ‘my’ oil
more abruptly than all those mastodons
in La Brea’s tar pits

now slender cormorants
who, everyone is sure, are drowning
as they swim along
neck barely afloat
no one realizing
the genius of cormorants
who can fly/swim 30 miles an hour
underwater
when they are not oiled

about the mpg of my car
my old car
for the ownership of which
I am quite guilty
for the replacement of which
I have no means

cormorants
must wave both wings
after every dive
to dry them
so that they may
dive and dive again
–no wave strong enough
to shake off ceaseless poison weight
of oil

it’s my fault, the reddish egrets
you know his own epitaph
written by photographer Ted Cross
for his own recent death
describing his multi-faceted self
on the Other Side
“still searching for the perfect photograph
of the reddish egret”

Ted did not have in mind
this soiled oiled specimen
trying, unsuccessfully
to lift newly leaden
legs wings and feet
out of Gulf mud muck and oil

it’s all my fault
and not because I use the wrong lightbulbs
in a couple of fixtures
nor because I do turn on the heat.
inside, in winter, sometimes
although I’ve been doing without air
conditioning so far this troubled year

it’s my fault
because I am an “extreme environmentalist”
because I think there should never be any more
drilling for oil in our country
because I deplore petrotyrrany
the privatization of profits
socialization of poverty
because I think we should start with the auto companies

well, what do you expect, Sarah?
I grew up in Detroit

I’ve never seen a wolf in the wild
as you do and deplore
–these beings you condemn to bloody deaths
I would embrace

nor have I encountered
a single polar bear
let alone a starving female trying to find food
for her new brood
attempting to swim with them
toward vanishing ice floes

but that’s o.k. with you
Sarah
it makes the hunting
easier

it’s my fault, Sarah
for I am quite literally
a tree hugger

I believe that greed should end
America return to her original nobility
where people pledged lives
fortunes
sacred honor
remember sacred honor?
— ah, well, probably not, Sarah

I believe we are our Planet’s
Keepers

Sarah – who are you?

~~~~~~~~~~

STATEMENT
what everyone must remember, wherever anyone lives (not only those of us in New Jersey’s key migratory corridor, the only state with three coastlines) is that these are our birds, our waters.  Because of the Gulf Stream, this catastrophe is global.  We may have passed the tipping point.  We are all the oiled pelican.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

OK, that’s not the only political poem these days:

 

SHIP OF STATE

 

Roosevelt died again

— I can’t help it!

I keep reading histories/

biographies of WWII

 

and he’s there

at the helm

jaunty, sure

eyes all asparkle

despite Depression

war-on-two fronts

cigarette slanted

in that elegant holder

easy at the wheel

 

no circling shadows yet

dim those piercing eyes – nothing

forces the wide and reassuring grin

from that dashing face

— emblem of my childhood

 

he can sail forever

circumnavigate

this imperiled globe

that was so much less imperiled

in his hands

 

CAROLYN FOOTE EDELMANN

January 2015

 

Here may be my most radical ever.  I see Edward Snowden right up there with our Founding Fathers and Thomas Paine, yes, at the barricades, willing to give lives, fortunes and sacred honor so that our noble country can live, thrive, and persist.

 

Pole Farm, Lawrenceville NJ, America The Beautiful

Pole Farm, Lawrenceville NJ, America The Beautiful

 

REVOLUTIONARY HEROISM, 21ST CENTURY

 

I understand you, Edward Snowden

you find a country

notorious for terrorism

safer

than your own

 

you love your own

enough

to fight for its return

to sacred honor

blood-won rights

–privacy above all

 

you love your own

enough to give her up

hoping

that your sacrifice

will turn around

our country’s

despoilation / ruination

 

I understand you

praise your courage

 

wonder what it is that I can do

to turn the tide

 

CAROLYN FOOTE EDELMANN

January 2015

 

Preserved Farm, Essential America, Salem County NJ

Preserved Farm, Essential America, Salem County NJ

LIGHT-FILLED DINER — HYDE PARK — “WORTHY OF THE JOURNEY

NJWILDBEAUTY readers are accustomed, possibly too accustomed, to my being enervated and worse by lack of light.  On the other hand, you also experience in your writer a certain ecstasy in the presence of light.  Add to that the hint of time-travel and surprisingly satisfying food, and you have my all-time favorite diner.  It doesn’t hurt that major historical shrines of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt await nearby.

It’s in Hyde Park (New York), where I travel on Roosevelt-quests, as much Eleanor, of course, as Franklin.  And it’s a step back into my teen-age years, except we didn’t have anything nearly so exciting in Detroit!

Hyde Park's Iconic Diner at Night

Hyde Park’s Iconic Diner at Night

Floats!  Time Travel...

Floats! Time Travel…

Glowing Interior

Glowing Interior

Franks

Franks

Sandwiches

Sandwiches

And, of course, COCKTAILS

And, of course, COCKTAILS

Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup and Fresh Hot Biscuits -- I would go back for this alone...

Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup and Fresh Hot Biscuits — I would go back for this alone…

Nouvelle BLT at Eveready Diner, Hide Park

Nouvelle BLT at Eveready Diner, Hide Park

Our Table, Our Reward after the (rain-slashed) Day's Long Ride

Our Table, Our Reward after the (rain-slashed) Day’s Long Ride

Howard Johnson’s, it isn’t!

That was the closest I’d ever come to a diner in my Michigan life.  First one I met was the Edison Diner in New Jersey in the 1980’s.  And it was industrial strength…

Mr. Coffee

Mr. Coffee

Whimsical and retro, I’m sure you see why I make at least one pilgrimage per Hyde Park trip, to the Eveready!  Breakfasts are hearty, hefty, also filled with light, even on downpour days– stoking us for continuance, whether to or from the Berkshires.

Night Delights, Hyde Park

Night Delights, Hyde Park

Even now, looking back on our October trip, this diner shimmers like a mirage.

The diner is right on Route 9, not far from FDR’s Springwood.  Stay at the ’50’s motel, impeccably kept, to which one is warmly welcomed, The Roosevelt Inn.  Make reservations by phone – the owner/hostess enjoys that.  This is also on #9, a few blocks north of the diner, and near one of the town’s timeless churches, which plays a hymn at 6 p.m. — which may well honor the Angelus.

The highlight of that day was a Ranger-guided tour at Eleanor’s home, Val-Kill, tucked into woods, just far enough from Sara Roosevelt.  The President loved going to Eleanor’s haven, for which he gave her the land; and for which he, an amateur architect, made clever plans.

Unbeknownst to me for decades, Franklin also had a Sara-haven on the Val-Kill property, Top Cottage.  If you’re not delayed by rain, heading to Hyde Park, you can arrange to visit both in one day.  Details may be found by checking the FDR Library site.

You used to have to pay for tickets and take bus to Val-Kill and then back and then another such arrangement for Top Cottage.  We could drive into Val-Kill, pay among a cluster of very friendly Rangers.  What I love about the Roosevelt guides, in Springwood and the Library, as well, is that they bring ‘my’ President and his lady back to life.  Even last October, it was as though Eleanor would come ’round the corner at any moment, pick up her knitting, and settle down next to Fala’s basket.

(Fala was FDR’s Scottie — very famous in his day, and thoroughly bereaved, as was I as a child, by the death of that larger-than-life man, my only president, due to all those terms…)

The night before departure for Hyde Park, my travel-and-hiking friend, Deb Hill, and I watched the last ‘reel’ of the splendid PBS special on the Roosevelts of the Hudson River Valley, by our arch-film historian, Ken Burns.

Franklin's and Eleanor's Train Station -- many a campaign speech took place at this site...

Franklin’s and Eleanor’s Train Station — many a campaign speech took place at this site…

This Welcomed the President Home

This Welcomed the President Home

This May Have Held Their Baggage -- Milk Cans of Hyde Park

This May Have Held Their Baggage — Milk Cans of Hyde Park

Another Form of Time Travel -- Fresh From Hyde Park Cows

Another Form of Time Travel — Fresh From Hyde Park Cows

BAGGAGE of Hyde Park

BAGGAGE of Hyde Park

Wild Grape -- Hyde Park Train Station

Wild Grape — Hyde Park Train Station

This is a casserole I made in advance, had ready to sustain us travelers, upon our return.

FOOD BACK HOME AFTER JOURNEY Strata, Ready to Bake

FOOD BACK HOME AFTER JOURNEY
Strata, Ready to Bake

STRATA - PART II

STRATA – PART II

STRATA READY TO BAKE -- A NOURISHING WELCOME

STRATA READY TO BAKE — A NOURISHING WELCOME