“WHITE ASH” Poem – ‘in memoriam’: Ash Trees in storm track of emerald-ash-borer-infestation

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Ashes, Green and Gold, from Internet

A phonecall just surprised me at work, conveying gratitude for one of my nature poems — in the most recent Sourland Conservancy newsletter.  Long ago, this courageous group had asked for seasonal poems they might use to further preservation in their pages.  I had frankly forgotten.

I urge your strong support of these generous people.   In word and deed, they honor and preserve one of New Jersey’s most crucial stretches of contiguous forest, and water source par excellence.]  NJWILDBEAUTY readers read often of my favorite Sourlands hike, off Hopewell’s Greenwood Avenue.  This post holds the link to newsletter, with that poem in place:  http://sourland.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Sourland-Journal-Autumn-2016.pdf

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Golden Ash from Internet

My current dwelling is surrounded by imposing ash trees.  This year, probably for drought reasons, — instead of their leaves turning boring seared brown– all these monarchs represent the new gold standard.  The light through their leaves is literally blinding, as though glancing off the rare metal itself.  I leave my living room to follow the sun in late afternoon, so I won’t miss a moment of dazzle.

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Golden Ash from Internet, closest in shape to, yet far younger than, ‘mine’

As for the white ash tree of the the poem, I never saw its leaves.  That ash by the towpath is termed ‘white’; the ones near me in Lawrenceville ‘black’.  Ashes represent stateliness surpassed only by oaks, such as the late lamented Mercer Oak, under which the dying Mercer continued to direct the Battle of Princeton.

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Gilded Ash Leaves, October -Blue Sky from Internet

Usually, for me, nature leads to poems.  This time, the poem led to nature.

Published in U.S.1 Newspaper, the man who’d numbered the rings called my editor, the paper’s founder Rich Rein.  He politely requested to be put in touch with me.  The outcome was a shared hike to his ash, mourning already that the elements were having their way with those precise pencil marks.  Ever after, I have called my guide, “Mr. Impeccable”…

It never occurred to me, nor I think, to him, that we could lose our bounty of regional ash trees.  Beware, everyone!  Even the fate of the sturdiest trees is imperiled by climate change:  New Jersey’s ever-warmer winters encourage insects to multiply.  As I urge  so often, please do everything possible through your life choices, –as in writing editors, signing on-line petitions, and especially voting–, to focus our country’s attention on altering climate change once and for all. 

Together, we can bring forth human change for the better, for a change

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Green Trees of Ash from Internet

The Sourland Consevancy chose this poem now, not only to praise ash trees. Their key purpose was to inform readers that we will no soon be bereft of ashes.

These majestic ones will no longer shade; nourish; delight; absorb carbon; shelter squirrels and birds from warblers to raptors; cradle nests; nor fling down a king’s ransom in gold.

The fate of the ashes, the climate, the Planet itself is in your hands.

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Ash Majesty Measured, From Internet

[I wrote this poem in the year 2000, when thinking in terms of eons was the norm…]

WHITE ASH

 

I take the high track

where the path splits

wondering if the felled trunk

remains to block my way

 

but it’s been sawn

and someone impeccable

has named the tree

numbered its annular rings:

“1872”   “1905”   “1950”

 

this enormous trunk

yet a mere two inches

mark years from my grade school

until this year’s tree-death

 

–faint the rings

and fainter still the penciled

letters naming this compacted

wood — preferred for baseball

bats because it does not crack

 

my own annular rings

do not bear numbering

 

 

 

CAROLYN FOOTE EDELMANN

February/March 2000

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Our So-Called Governor

Old Glory Flies above PRESERVED East Point Light on the Imperiled Delaware Bayshore

East Point Light and Flag May 2015

East Point Light and Flag, Delaware Bayshore

 

I’m saying it like it is.  My NJWILDBEAUTY readers have ‘heard’ me in other posts, lamenting the lack of true liberty in our land.  Noting that the more our government prates of ‘liberty’ and names airports for that lost reality, the more it harps on ‘security’, the less we have of either.

I need someone wise to explain to me, “Whatever happened to democracy?”

I don’t know whether we’re under oligarchy or tyranny, but whatever it IS is the opposite of everything for which our Founding Fathers/Sisters/Mothers pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor.  From melting the pewter to make bullets, to writing and signing the Declaration of Independence, they ‘screwed their courage to the sticking place.’

And we echo T.S. Eliot — we are expected to let officials “teach us to be and not to be, teach us to sit still…”

NO!

OK, –everyone who cares about wild beauty anywhere–, what are you going to do about this?  Write me.  Tell me what you will do to turn around this travesty of government:

[reminder, open land is the ultimate carbon sink… hence the Categories re climate change…]

Contacts: Ed Potosnak, (732) 991-7574

May 23, 2016                                                                                      Kelly Mooij, (732) 539-1693

 

ESSENTIAL PRESERVATION PROGRAMS REMAIN UNFUNDED AS GOVERNOR DENIES VOTERS’ WILL AND CONDITIONALLY VETOES OPEN SPACE LEGISLATION

TRENTON, NJ—Governor Christie conditionally vetoed S969/A780, the Preserve New Jersey Act, which would have provided the authorization and guidance to begin funding state, county, local and non-profit open space, farmland, and historic preservation programs consistent with the constitutional amendment passed in 2014 with 65 percent of voters’ support. After the Governor pocket vetoed implementation language at the end of last session, both houses of the Legislature prioritized this bill, and passed it again this year with strong bipartisan support.

“We are appalled by the Governor’s disregard for the will of voters,” said Ed Potosnak, Chair of Keep It Green. “By conditionally vetoing this legislation, the Governor guaranteed New Jersey’s important Green Acres, Farmland Preservation, and Historic Preservation programs will continue to be denied voter-dedicated funds to preserve lands that protect our drinking water, grow Jersey Fresh produce, create community parks, and preserve our historic sites,” he continued.

“The reliability and predictability of funding, which voters supported and which would have been achieved if the bill had been signed, is central to the success of these programs,” said Kelly Mooij, Coordinator of Keep It Green. “Without this legislation, preservation programs have had to delay or cut important projects and the State will be unable to develop long-term, strategic plans for wise investment. This flies in the face of the original purpose of the amendment, the well-established history of the program and could severely hurt the State in the long run,” Mooij continued.

Governor Christie’s veto memo noted his desire for greater ‘flexibility’ in the budgeting process and less “granular” detail from the Legislature.

“The Legislature has now twice put this bill on the Governor’s desk and he has vetoed and conditionally vetoed this critical legislation because he wants ‘flexibility’,” said Ed Potosnak, Chair of Keep It Green. “This rationale is offensive to New Jerseyans who constitutionally dedicated these funds to preserve open space, farmland, and historic sites and to support stewardship programs. The voters supported the constitutional dedication in order to ensure funding wasn’t subject to the year-to-year whims of politicians,” Potosnak explained.

In FY2016, when no implementation language was passed, the Governor improperly used voter- dedicated funds to pay for park staff salaries, even after the Legislature removed authorizing language from his proposed budget and identified a different funding source. He has once again proposed using the funds for salaries this year.

“Both chambers of the Legislature rejected Governor Christie’s proposal to divert open space funds to plug holes in the DEP’s budget because it is inconsistent with the intent of voters,” said Potosnak. “These funds are supposed to go to programs that preserve lands that protect our drinking water, grow some of the best produce in the world, and ensure our history is passed down to future generations. Without the guidance provided by the language in the Preserve New Jersey Act, Governor Christie raided the funds in FY2016 and is brazenly trying to use the funds for the same purpose again this year, which only reinforces the need for this legislation,” he continued.

The Governor also criticized the lack of specifically enumerated funding for Blue Acres in the three year funding bill, despite the fact that Green Acres funds can be used to fund Blue Acres projects and that sufficient funds remain in the Blue Acres programs for buy-outs to continue at the current rate until the legislation sunsets.

“Blue Acres funding is a critical part of the preservation program and must be included in the long-term investment portfolio of the State. This implementation legislation would have provided guidance for disbursement of the CBT funds for the next three years only. At the current rate of buy-outs, the Blue Acres program will not run out of funding before this legislation sunsets.” Said Kelly Mooij.

“The Governor is being disingenuous when he says Blue Acres is absent from this bill. He knows, or should know, the Green Acres funding included within this allocation can be used for Blue Acres projects. Additionally, when the CBT dedication increases from 4% to 6%, as supported by the voters in 2014, additional funds will become available. A portion of that increase should be dedicated to Blue Acres,” added Ed Potosnak

In the more than 50 years of these legacy preservation programs, detailed implementation language has always accompanied or followed the dedication of new funds.  Every previous Governor, Republican and Democrat, who was presented with implementing legislation, signed the bills.

“The Governor has, in an unprecedented fashion, ignored the will of the voters and rejected the bipartisan effort put forth by the Legislature to reliably, transparently and predictably provide funding for vital preservation programs,” said Mooij. “We plan to investigate all options to ensure the constitutionally-dedicated monies are released to fund these critical programs as the overwhelming majority of New Jerseyans intended,” she concluded.

About New Jersey Keep It Green: New Jersey Keep It Green is a coalition of more than 180 park and conservation organizations working to create a long-term, dedicated source of funding for the preservation and stewardship of New Jersey’s natural areas, waterways, parks, farmland and historic sites. NJ Keep It Green led successful campaigns to pass statewide ballot measures in 2006, 2007, and 2009 generating $600 million for state open space, farmland and historic preservation programs. In 2014, NJ Keep It Green led a successful campaign that supports sustained, long-term funding for preservation and stewardship. For more information or to sign the NJ Keep It Green Statement of Support, visit http://www.njkeepitgreen.org.

This follows my signature at work.  Perhaps those who rule our country now, the new versions of King George III, are dead set against the whole world’s being ‘kin’.

“One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.”

           William Shakespeare