OUTDOOR MAGIC IN AN INDOOR TIME

Nearing the Delaware River on November’s Last Weekend, 2016

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Pleasant Valley Road, New Jersey, just east of the Delaware River

 

Part of me wants to stay indoors, curled up with a book these days — especially my friend Mary Wood’s collection on FDR, ER, Winston and times of excellence and true leadership.  Part of me well knows that the most healing place for this particular person is out in Nature, usually in New Jersey.  A recent nearby journey tied politics, history, liberty, beauty and nature into a perfect package.

 

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Carversville Inn, Decorated for Christmas, 2015

In tumult over the recent election, Tasha O’Neill, Alan McIlroy and I journeyed to Carversville, Pennsylvania, in quest of hours of fellowship and the perfect lunch – which we achieved.  We didn’t even need menus.  Fragrant Escargots for the two of them, Mushroom Ragout for me.  Then the handsome Diver Scallop, wrapped in its savory scarf of applewood-smoked bacon, piqued with microgreens, and adorned with the most delicate citrine sauce.  Sunlight dappled onto our shoulders through wavy windowglass of the venerable building, originating in the mid-1800s.  Opulent desserts thrilled.  Timelessness and merry deft service surrounded us.

 

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Old Mill Ruin, Fleecydale Road, Carversville, Pennsylvania

 

Then we were out on fascinating roads leading away from our gastronomic haven.  Sometimes, it seems that trekking with friends with cameras is even more exciting than birding.    Can this be?  Is this heresy?

 

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Autumn’s Farewell, Carversville

 

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Winter Holds Sway in Pennsylvania

 

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November’s Farewell, Carversville

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Absolute Peace on Fleecydale Road

 

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Historic Carversville

 

Remnants of Determined Woodpecker, Carversville, Fleecydale Road Hike

 

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Autumn’s Last Gap, Pleasant Valley Road, New Jersey

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America The Beautiful, Pleasant Valley Road, New Jersey

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My Country, ‘Tis of Thee, Pleasant Valley Road, east of Delaware River, in New Jersey

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This Land is Our Land… looking toward the Delaware that Washington Crossed to Victories

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Looking Toward Bowman’s Tower Hill, Where Washington Scouted the Delaware River before the Crossing

When men and women pledged their “lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor” to bring forth a land devoted to Liberty.

FRENCHTOWN AT SUNDOWN

Never, not even in the dire days of the death of my first voted President, John F. Kennedy, has nature been more essential to me.

This is a recent quest for healing of the soul, along the Delaware River, for whose fate I have fought for decades.  The essence of Delaware towns in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and on the New Jersey side, is timelessness.

Hope also resides there, as that superb politician, Bucks County Congressman Peter Kostmayer, forged ahead to prevent the building of the Tocks Island Dam and have our river named “Wild and Scenic” wherever it is not ruined by the forces of growth and greed.

Come stroll the sun down with us…

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The Golden Hour, Delaware River Bridge and Bench at Evening

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Audible Beauty, at the hem of the ‘Delaware, Frenchtown

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Audible Voyagers, Wild and Free, above the Delaware

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Venerable Bricks, Frenchtown

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“The Heart of the Matter,” Frenchtown

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“… a yellow wood…” Frenchtown –  “seeing how way leads on to way…”    Frost

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The Gold Standars — Frenchtown in November 2016

Regard these timeless, priceless scenes.  Remember, we are blessed by towpath settings that have been preserved by the courageous.  Heed Margaret Mead:  “A SMALL GROUP OF PEOPLE CAN CHANGE THE WORLD.      INDEED, IT IS THE ONLY THING THAT EVER HAS.”

Be vigilant concerning our wild spaces.  This is FREEDOM CENTRAL.

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Last Light on Delaware River, Frenchtown

 

 

IMPRESSIONIST JOURNEY UP-RIVER ALONG THE DELAWARE

Come, wander upriver with Jeanette Hooban and me, on a leisurely November weekend afternoon.  Suffuse yourselves with history, beauty, timelessness, tranquility, and, o, yes, the art pottery which was the trigger for our journey.

NJWILDBEAUTY readers may fully know that the Delaware is my sacred favorite river.  That I have fought for the river and her valley since I moved to Bucks County in 1981, to discover that a vile PUMP was poised to remove 200 million gallons a day from this tidal miracle of ours.  That we won the referendum, but lost the battle.  The PUMP was built while I lived in France.  But our well-publicized ceaseless battle against ‘progress’ and profit and, frankly, high powered GREED itself, cut the gallons that are taken daily to cool a nuclear power plant on the Susquehanna.  My Congressman, Peter Kostmayer, fought to have what’s left of the Delaware named Wild and Scenic.  The shad have blessed his efforts by returning.

Come wander the Delaware Valley northward, to a place before power plants and pumps.

 

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Autumn Detritus, Vintage Bridge, Point Pleasant, Pennsylvania

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Vintage Bridge, Point Pleasant, PA

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Splendor in the Grasses, Pt. Pleasant, PA

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Centerpiece, Pt. Pleasant, PA

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Brick Masterpiece, Pt. Pleasant, PA

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Bygone Days, Pt. Pleasant, PA

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Modern Bridge, in Drought Time, Pt. Pleasant, NJ

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“Down By the Station”, Pt. Pleasant, PA

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Venerable Doorway, Pt. Pleasant, PA

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Vintage Doorway, Point Pleasant, PA

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Tinsman Pottery Gallery — Reason for Jeanette Hooban’s and My Delaware River Sojourn Nov. 2016

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Haitian Art, Bucks County Art — Synthesis: 2026

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As Phillips Mill Artist Pat Martin Created this Collation of Art and Artists

This may very well be The Heart of the Matter:

As I add this last photo, into my e-mail comes the most valuable contact: RIVERWATCH.

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WATER IS SACRED! PERMIT NO PIPELINES, ANYWHERE!

This Week’s Riverwatch – November 18, 2016 Email not displaying correctly?
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This Week’s Riverwatch

November 18, 2016

  • Marches and rallies are held throughout the Delaware River Watershed in solidarity with those opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline project.
  • A company seeking to repair and replace a pipeline that runs under the Delaware River in South Jersey is seeking Clean Water Act permits.
  • Reservoir levels are dropping in the Delaware River Basin as drought conditions worsen.
The Delaware Riverkeeper Network presents a weekly video news roundup of important stories affecting the Delaware River Watershed. Many people live along and depend on the Delaware River for their water supply, their livelihoods or for recreation. For many it’s a place to escape the stress of living in a densely populated area.

If the Delaware River touches you in some way you’ll want to know what’s happening in all the areas of the watershed. This weekly report will tell you about the important issues that affect the water quality, tributary streams and key habitat in the entire watershed from the Catskills to Cape May County and from Deposit to Delaware City.

You can see past editions of Riverwatch on the Delaware Riverkeeper Network’s YouTube Channel Here

 

Contact
Address: 925 Canal St
Suite 3701
Bristol, PA 19007
Phone: (215)369-1188
Fax: (215)369-1181
Email: drn@delawareriverkeeper.org
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Copyright © 2016 , All rights reserved.

SHADY WALKS: US 1 NEWSPAPER article & LAMBERTVILLE & BARLEY SHEAF FARM, PA.

NJWILDBEAUTY readers know that sometimes, (if VERY fortunate), I can convince local editors to feature nature articles for their readers.  I’m very aware that people of the 21st Century, if they are not out IN Nature, can absolutely forget, if not negate her.

The perilous state of journalism in our time renders my media appearances more and more scarce.  Nonetheless, those who find US 1 Business Newspaper tomorrow/Wednesday, August 10, will see my article on four shady walks in this time of searing sunlight.  I’ve been blessed to have a new poem, “Earthwise”, in US 1’s Fiction Issue the past two weeks.

Lambertville Towpath Water and Shade

Canalside Shade, Lambertville Towpath

Meanwhile, on  Sunday, I relished a fine shady towpath hike with Jeanette Hooban, (original Intrepid), first heading north out of Lambertville (NJ), then south, so far as the weir, otherwise known as the rapids of the Delaware River near New Hope.  There are towpaths with canal on both sides of this river that I cherish above all others.  Our side has the right amount of water in it.  Pennsylvania is finally getting ’round to filling theirs to historic levels, but it’s taking an unconscionably long time.

Lambertville Towpath Doowary

Typical Lambertville Canalside House

I have to admit, since I am in terrific turbulence over the difficult diagnosis given my 20-year-old great nephew last week, my ‘eye’, –as manifested through my camera–, was seriously off during these refreshing hours.

Bear with me, nonetheless.  I will expand the quantity and quality of my meagre offering with fine photographs by Jeanette and by Brenda Jones, known to readers of this blog and its predecessor for the Packet, NJWILD.

Know that Jeanette and I relished every foot(e)fall.  That the journey WAS the destination.  And that our culminating brunch at Pennsylvania’s Barley Sheaf Inn, past Lahaska, may have been our most luminous yet.  Every sustaining visit to this haven (known for weddings) has us plotting our return, listing the friends with we MUST share this multi-faceted excellence.

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“Sunshine On Your Shoulders…” — Towering Towpath Sunflower

Exquisite as the food was, as always; chaleureuse (warm) as the welcome always is; beckoning as the grounds always are, we could barely eat for watching continuous courtship dances of various species of butterflies.

BlackSwallowtail among Loosestrife Brenda Jones

Black Swallowtail Nectaring by Brenda Jones

Come with us to our post-hike haven — Barley Sheaf Inn:

A Barley Sheaf Dormers and Autust Sky

Barley Sheaf Inn Dormer and August Sky

A Barley Sheaf Balcony

Barley Sheaf Shadows

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Dance of the Cabbage Whites by Brenda Jones

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Barley Sheaf Inn Pond, Fed by Spring Once Essential to Indians

A Barley Sheaf Summer Garden

Barley Sheaf Inn Pool Garden

A Barley Sheaf Pool House

Barley Sheaf Inn Pool House

clouds by Jeanette Hooban

Barley Sheaf Inn Summer Skies by Jeanette Hooban

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Les Deux Carolines, Brunching in Moss Hart’s Exquisite Dining Room

Jeanette's Breakfast Barley Sheaf by Jeanette

Jeanette’s Eggs Benedict by Jeanette Hooban

A Barley Sheaf Petals for the Bride

Petals for the Bride

A Barley Sheaf Tracery

Barley Sheaf Tracery, Above the Rose Petal Path

lotus by Jeanette Hooban

Lotus Farewell, Barley Sheaf Farm by Jeanette Hooban

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Swallowtail and Bee — Two Pollinators to One Flower — by Brenda Jones

HOW GREEN WAS OUR VALLEY, — The Delaware Valley

When I reflect on the spring nearly past, all I see is grey  — in skies and clouds, in ceaseless chill rains, in blinding fogs, and in my own imprisoned mood.  However, there were excursions, stolen between the raindrops, which reveal the incredible bounty of the Delaware Valley.

Thanks to courageous women, this preserve was saved for all time, to showcase the rarest wildflowers which belong in all the woods and all along the banks of our beloved Delaware River.

BOWMAN’S HILL WILDFLOWER PRESERVE

below New Hope, PA

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Toad Trillium Among the Bluebells, Bowman’s, April 2016

Celandine and Bluebells by the Creek

Celandine and Bluebells line trail along PIdcock Creek

Stroll with me on the well-tended trails, beautifully restored after Hurricane Sandy’s depredations — so very far from the sea of its birth.  Open all your senses, as the work week, this techno-century rarely permit.  Inhale the very fecundity of the good earth, celebrated so brilliantly by Pennsylvania’s Pearl S. Buck.  Let your ears learn your first phoebe!, phoebe!; the purrrrrr of red-bellied woodpeckers in healthily aged trees; the scree! of a single red-tailed hawk high above the almost leafed-out canopy.  Absorb quintessential tranquillity, where the creek’s murmurs and whispers call you ever more deeply into the sacred woods.Bluebell Sea

Bluebell Sea, Where I Usually Begin my Bowman’s Explorations

It’s worth doing Bowman’s for the Medicinal Trail alone.  There I first heard and almost saw the pileated woodpecker dive from tree to tree.  There a young boy, –thrilled as I to watch spring’s first garter snakes unwind from winter’s tangle–, splashed into the creek to save a snake who’d tumbled in.  Along the creek, forest monarchs rest, Sandy-felled, roots taller than two or three humans standing on one another’s shoulders.  I always thank their majesties for their time here.

On the Medicinal Trail’s Bridge, a man and woman told me they’d just seen the (can it be?!) Louisiana Waterthrush.  All three of us watched a slender dark furry being curl and curve above the rocks, along the bank.  It was so at home, so sure in its hunting.  And we remained unsure whether it was mink or marten.  Above all, Medicinal Trail holds trillium of many hues and funny names.  No one can ever explain the name of the tight red one above (which never opens farther), somehow christened “Toad”.

First White Trilliujm

Virginal White Trillium

I’m always so pleased with the wondrous work of Staff and energetic, consummately generous Bowman’s volunteers.  Most invasives have been mastered.  Trails are well marked, well tended, pretty and inviting.  Boardwalks lead over (increasingly) wet spots.  Their gift shop is tasteful, gift-wise, and irresistible book-wise.  Whoever’s at the desk, usually a volunteer, is always happy to see each visitor and eager to serve.

White Trillium Close-Up

Shy Trillium

My only quarrel is that there is no sign on the Medicinal Trail, instructing the un-knowing, such as I, in what each rarity was used to treat — most likely discovered by local Lenapes, long before the concept of fenced preservation came into being.

Take yourself to Bowman’s in all seasons.  Ideal habitat for birds, for plants from anemone and twinleaf and bloodroot to prickly pear; and for voyagers, seeking an idyllic world – such as all of America was before we arrived, carrying with us the Anthropocene and all its losses and perils.

Become a Bowman’s member.  Join their invasive-pulling volunteers.  Attend their black tie and muck boots spring gala.  And murmur thanks to those wise early women who knew that saving beauty of this magnitude is essential to the human spirit.

NEW PHOTOS SENT FOR BLOG FROM BRENDA JONES, Fine Art Photographer

My dear friend and superb photographer, Brenda Jones, sends these images of a mink and a waterthrush, found nearby (to Princeton), and therefore likely at Bowman’s.  Enjoy her unique artistry!

Waterthrush with larvae by Brenda Jones

Waterthrush with Larvae by Brenda Jones

 

MinkMillstoneAqueduct by Brenda Jones

Mink, Millstone Aqueduct, by Brenda Jones