TRULY RURAL: SELLERSVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA

Modern Male Sellersville

MODERN MALE, SELLERSVILLE, PA, FOURTH OF JULY WEEKEND

(A recent Pearl S. Buck pilgrimage took a friend and me also to surrounding towns in very rural Pennsylvania.  Sellersville was a curious combination of past and present.  We had to turn to Wikipedia to learn some of its past.)

Guide Pearl Buck Estate July 2017

EMMA, OUR CHARMING GUIDE TO NEARBY PEARL BUCK ESTATE

Sellersville was founded in the early 18th century. It was centered on a major road known as Bethlehem Pike that connected Philadelphia to Bethlehem and the rest of what was then far Western Pennsylvania.

(Wikipedia is rather voluble about this tiny burg surrounded by farmland, hills and almost-mountains of the appropriate shade of violet.)

(We had begun our Pearl Buck-quest at a delightfully vibrant and lively farmers’ market in Perkasie.  First peaches joined healthy cabbage, vibrant tomatoes and a rainbow, so to speak, of fresh ‘greens’, sold by the farmers themselves.)

The ‘shank of the day’ was spent exploring the Pearl Buck Estate on nearby Dublin Road. 

Welcome Sellersville Rural PA July

WELCOME TO SELLERSVILLE

Our finale was a bountiful and gracious late lunch at Sellarsville’s remarkably sophisticated Washington Inn, in what most people otherwise might describe as ‘a backwater’.  The name of that Inn was just part of the constant Fourth-of-July references that peppered our adventure, –none planned and all greatly appreciated–, on our Country’s sacred Birthday weekend.)

Flag Sellersville PA

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, DEAR AMERICA, FROM SELLERSVILLE

The town was very small and was called Sellers Tavern. Its most notable feature was a large inn. The present Washington House in Sellersville, however, was not Sellers Tavern.

Washington Inn Side View Sellersville PA

HOW WASHINGTON INN LOOKED FROM MAIN STREET IN ITS PAST

The town grew slowly over the years until the Industrial Revolution. In the 1860s the North Pennsylvania Railroad was built, running parallel to Bethlehem Pike: this stimulated the growth of light textile industries and brought a wave of population growth.

Proud Past Sellersville Rural PA July 2017

PROUD PAST – SELLSERSVILLE’S MAIN STREET

The East Branch of the Perkiomen Creek runs through the town, connecting it to an adjacent town of Perkasie. This creek was dammed in the early 20th century,  creating a small body of water known as Lake Lenape. (So, even in Pennsylvania, places are named after those who were destroyed — these first settlers — in order that ‘progress’ might take place…)

Along the length of the lake, a park was built on Perkasie and Sellersville lands. In the 1920s and 1930s this park housed a carousel, a roller coaster and several other amusements.

The railroad brought hundreds of people from Philadelphia in the summertime.  It became a well known vacation spot for blue-collar city workers.

Sellersville Theatre 1894 2017

SELLERSVILLE THEATER, 1894

The town was also home to the Radium Company of America, which was the largest uranium milling facility in the world at the time.  (There seems to be no notice of the human toll of uranium milling, or the “luminescence” to follow.  At Wheaton Glass Museum in South Jersey, the human toll of luminous glassware is frankly declared.)

Cloud Bank Sellersville PA

TURRETED TOWN OF SELLERSVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA

The United States Gauge Company originated in Sellersville in 1904.  It became a prominent manufacturer of gauges for military use, many of which were coated with radium-based paint[1] for nighttime luminesence. The company later became instrumental in the production of nuclear weapons,[2] leaving behind a legacy of industrial and radioactive contamination that has been well-hidden by local, county, state, and federal government agencies for decades.  (Ironically, my friend – who had planned this intricate excursion- and I were actively speaking with longing of the healthy air, the healthy lives these fortunate residents must have!)

Clematis Exuberance Sellersville PA

CLEMATIS EXUBERANCE, WASHINGTON INN

Today the town is still relatively small, sandwiched between a ridge line and the larger town of Perkasie. The center of town still runs along Bethlehem Pike, now called Old Route 309.

Storied Washington Inn Sellersville PA July 2017

THE WASHINGTON INN, 2017

The Washington House still stands and has recently been restored to become an upscale restaurant.

Washington House Sellersville PA

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT: WASHINGTON INN

Next door to the restaurant was a livery stable, which was converted into a theater (later a movie theater) in 1894. It has since been restored.  It was reopened in 2001 as Sellersville Theater 1894 as a live music venue.  (The Washington Inn and the Sellersville Theater cooperate in evenings of food and drama.  My friend and I signed up for chances on “A Big Night in Sellersville — involving gastronomy and theatre and ‘a night in the Tower.’)

Parisian Cafe Chairs Sellersville PA

PARISIAN CHAIRS, WASHINGTON INN, SELLERSVILLE, PA

The creek is still dammed but only the carousel in Perkasie remains of the amusements.

The textile industry has long moved out of the area.  Sellersville has become mainly a residential town for people working in the many urban centers that are only a short commute away.

The town is surrounded on three sides by open country and spread-out housing developments.

The Teller Cigar Factory was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1987.

TURRET OF YESTERYEAR, SELLERSVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA

Sellersville Turret PA July 2017

 

PINELANDS ~ PIPELAND: Road to Ruin – Poems of This Imperiled Region

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Pump House, Clouds and Lilies in Waters of Haines Cranberry Bogs, Chatsworth

A trio of poems, arrow’s in this activist’s quiver:

Probably all NJWILDBEAUTY readers know that, last Friday, the Pinelands Commission DARED approve the first pipeline in New Jersey’s Crown Jewel: The Pine Barrens.  This one is “The South Jersey Gas Pipeline Project.”  A pipeline by any name would smell as foul.  The Pinelands Commission was founded to preserve, protect, even enhance this 1.1 million-acre wooded region, sited atop the legendary 17-trillion-gallion Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer of highest quality water.

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Traditional Cranberry Harvest Tool

 

Former NJ Governors Brendan Byrne, Jim Florio and Christine Todd Whitman joined forces to file a Friend of Court Brief to overturn approval of the Pipeline.  But the forces of greed have won anew, and New Jersey will never be the same.  Our beautiful state is being turned into a Sacrifice Zone, and who is to arrest this destruction?

 

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Essence of the Bogs, Chatsworth

 

Once, I lamented to a caller, “I’m a poet.  What am I doing at the barricades?”  The activist on the other end of the line retorted, “Carolyn, that’s where poets belong.”

I’m not good with barricades.  Although I support and thrill to effective protest marches, they are beyond my physical/spiritual/mental/emotional strength.

 

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Pinelands’ Pristine Tannic Waters, Batsto

The only arrows in my quiver are Pinelands poems.  Here are a few, to remind NJWILDBEAUTY readers of what we are about to forfeit:

This was one of the original “Hot Poems by Cool Women”, a favorite of what we came to see as our poetic groupies, as our various new volumes reached the public through readings:

 

IT ALL STARTED

 

when we came upon

carpets of stars

cranberries in flower

trembling white below

the ice blue sky

 

along the hard-packed dikes

slumbrous bees

formed golden pyramids

on gleaming amber boxes

 

dawn’s pollinators

here to burst all bonds

course among broad acres

of waving stamens

 

at day’s end we stood on tiptoe

plucking first blued berries

from among the mauve and pink

at the tips of overarching bushes

 

tucked among hollies and sheep laurel

through thickets and tunnels

we made our way to the sea

mouths awash in warm berries

 

CAROLYN FOOTE EDELMANN

Cool Women, Volume I

 

RESURGENT

 

I long to slip into
peat water

watch my long legs turn
orange, then burnt sienna
bathed in tannins of old leaves
and newly desiccated needles
having steeped over the centuries
between primordial banks

I belong to the Pines and its peat
whether striding or swimming
requiring levels and mystery
–silent liquidities
–eloquent duskiness
even on bright days

over there, on a low branch
a slim snake twines
somnolent and sure

overhead, in the pine tops
winds echo ocean
near yet far

time keeps these waters warm
enough to welcome legs
too long denied the Pinelands

see how my limbs flicker and flash
–burnished in peatwater
–flames in the depths

CAROLYN FOOTE EDELMANN
US 1 Fiction Issue,

D&R Greenway Poets of Preservation

Written in Princeton Hospital
Immediately post-op  – 11 11 11

CRANAPPLE PIE

 

I’ve gathered apples of our Barrens

to blend with bright cranberries

sparked with honey of dawn’s bees

we two once awakened

on Chatsworth’s sandy dikes

 

I craft a random European tart

— ragged edges, coverless

in honor of your world that I so crave

in memory of ragged days, uncovered nights

 

the luminous glaze

oddly recollects

your ignited gaze

thrown back at me

in this new solitude

 

every inch of rooms you cherished

becomes apple-fragrant

our joyous kitchen above all

 

my fruits become a brigand’s cache

–rubies tossed with fine abandon

as I once flung caution to wild winds

when you stretched out fine hands

luring me, pirate-like, to irresistible back bays

 

CAROLYN FOOTE EDELMANN

                                                Cool Women, Volume Two

 

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Jersey’s Jewels, Sugar Sand, Chatsworth

 

Once, I carried books of others’ poems into hearings at Prallsville Mills, in my futile, idealistic attempt to convince decision-makers not to allow “The Villas of Tuscany”, –currently “Barclay Square” –, towering condos.  to profane our cherished, historic D&R Canal and Towpath.

I read words of Paul Muldoon and Gerry Stern and friends who later became the Cool Women, insisting that art is born in New Jersey beauty.  Trampling her open spaces, defiling sightlines of the canal — for these travesties are visible even deep down upon her waters in a kayak — destroys not only habitat for essential wild creatures.  It also spells the end of inspiration, the cessation of art catalyzed in these storied reaches.

Pipelines are nonessential, destructive, temporary in terms of jobs provided, and threaten ignition of the Pines and fouling of the pristine waters of the Pine Barrens.

Don’t let this happen.  Use whatever arrows are in your quiver to preserve, protect, and even enhance our entire state!

 

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Cranberries on the Vine, Chatsworth

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Pine Barrens Just-Picked Dry-harvested Cranberries as Sauce Extraordinaire, Back Home

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Cranberry Dry Harvest, Early November, 2015

This rich harvest tour took place through Pinelands Adventures: http://www.pinelandsadventures.org;

Which organization has come into being under the auspices of ever-militant, thoroughly vigilant Pinelands Preservation Alliance:  JOIN THEM — they turn around damage to the Pines, week after week after week:  http://www.pinelandsalliance.org

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Batsto Barn – Pine Barrens’ Mercantile History, Legendary Iron Forge Village

Without  “The Iron in the Pines”, from forges such as Batsto and Allaire and Martha’s Furnace, and beyond, George Washington would not have had cannon balls nor wagon wheels for Revolutionary Battles.  Pinelands shipbuilders and ship’s captains effectively fought the British and the Hessians, boldly advertising auctions of stores of captured ships in Philadelphia papers.  Mullica Rivermen rowed with muffled oars to change the course of history.  It is said, we would not have a country without the Mullica, without the Pine Barrens!

 

DELAWARE RIVERKEEPER: “Environmental Protection is Not a Partisan Issue”

 

 

Delaware, the River, and the Official Riverkeeper — Tale of Christmas and Courage

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Washington Crossing the Delaware to Trenton, from Internet, by Leutze

Christmas is a time for every citizen in our country and everywhere, to remember:

without the Delaware River, there wouldn’t BE an America. 

This post celebrates a mightily courageous woman — Maya von Rossum — the official Delaware Riverkeeper.  She’s articulate, accurate, and brilliant.  Following her blog, or attending to local news media night after night, readers marvel at Maya’s steady focus on the many perils of our boundary water, and what must be done to reverse them.  Some situations are obvious and seemingly internal: like pollution, stormwater run-off, animal wastes and fertilizer poisoning by nearby farms.  One, which I fought to prevent, is artificially emptying her to cool a nuclear power plant.  Other dangers are less visible, certainly far more difficult to describe — matters political.  Listen with me to our spokeswoman, what she has to say about our river, our country, our freedom in these times.  AND THE IMPORTANCE OF SPEAKING OUT. 

Thomas Paine exemplified the utmost daring and determination in his diatribes, polemics, books and pamphlets in the time of the American Revolution.  It is the essence of the country our Founding Fathers dared all to create, that vox populi  — the Citizen’s Voice — is to be encouraged and heeded so that liberty may truly exist. 

Thomas Jefferson felt the war could never have been won without Paine’s words.  It is no accident that his most famous book is Common Sense.

NJWILDBEAUTY long-time readers, –especially those who came aboard when this was a Packet Publications Blog, NJWILD –, know that I’ve been fighting for the well-being of our magnificent Delaware River since I moved to New Hope from Princeton in March of 1981.   I used postcards of the painting above to announce my change of address.

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Delaware River From Baldpate Mountain by Brenda Jones

That essential move across the river plunged me right into her perils.  Forces of greed, (though we did not bandy about that phrase in those days), a.k.a. PECO (Pennsylvania’s PSEG) and chemical firms, lawyers and judges, far-seeing realtors wanted to insert a pump into the Delaware.  To remove unconscionable amounts from this already too-thin river, and pump them to the Susquehanna River, where Del’s water would be used to cool a nuclear power plant.  A fierce protest group, Del-AWARE formed.  A newspaper was generated.  The printed word, the spoken word, and especially the televised word brought us national coverage in our battle for the river.

Our strategy meetings were held at a rather disreputable tavern, [Applejack’s – is it still there?] –appropriately upriver, on the river, above New Hope.  Remember that taverns were the meeting sites in the 1770s, where our seemingly impossible American Revolution unfolded.  I always picture early patriots, including Tom and John and George and Ben at Philadelphia’s City Tavern, banging pewter tankards on rough wooden tables, asserting “Give me LIBERTY or give me DEATH!”

In the 1980’s, near Lumberville, PA, just north of New Hope, my own friends, — women, including nursing mothers and venerable grandmothers–, lay down in front of the bulldozers set loose to ruin the river environmentlay down to save the river, and were jailed at what is now the Michener Museum.  For some reason, no one at that Bucks County penal institution seemed to have heard of the writ of habeas corpus, so those women were jailed for the entire weekend!  Patriots, indeed!  I think of this every time I view Delaware River Impressionists honored on the Michener’s former prison walls.

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Delaware in Flood, by Brenda Jones

I love our river even more than I cherish our state.  But I couldn’t lie down in front of bulldozers.  However, I could write.  I penned poems such as “I am The River Speaking” and “To Val (Sigstedt) and the Valorous” to be published in the DEL-AWARE newspaper.  One, written when the forces of greed blasted the river during the shad run, [and Nature generated a powerful mud-slide right across from the site of the proposed PUMP], ends, “Blast ME?  I’ll show YOU power!”

[To read the poems, here’s an earlier post with both in it:https://njwildbeauty.wordpress.com/2016/04/15/dump-the-pump-fighting-for-the-delaware-river-with-poems/comment-page-1/%5D

One feels so hopeless in the force of these impassive official corporate forces.  But I could also write prose, –especially letters to editors of Bucks County and Philadelphia Newspapers.  And, each week, in Doylestown, as a volunteer, I  penned position papers, releases and speeches for Congressional candidate, Peter Kostmayer.  Peter ultimately would see to it that our Del was named Wild and Scenic, for as much of her imperiled length as could possibly qualify.  He also played a major role in stopping the Tocks Island Dam Project. I’d write truths about the essentiality of saving our river one day, and see them on Page One of the Philadelphia Inquirer, as headlines, the next day.

THEN, as NOW, WORDS MATTERED – but they must be conveyed to the broadest possible public.

We succeeded in returning Peter to office, despite mockery, fury, insults, dirty tricks – like wording the Dump the Pump referendum backwards, so we had to vote YES to mean NO PUMP.  We won the May referendum to prevent the building of the PUMP. 

After which, I moved to France.  Upon my return, the PUMP was in place.  It had been a non-binding referendum.  Let the protestors beware…  However, our battle kept the greedy group from fulfilling their original plan to remove 200 million gallons a day from the River of the Revolution!

It’s almost Christmas, 1916.  Grave changes are afoot in our country, which could result in negative changes far more perilous and long-lasting than the Delaware’s unwelcome PUMP.

It’s also almost the anniversary of George’s famous Crossing, to win the two battles of Trenton and the one battle of Princeton.  Never forget that the third of our first victories took place in Princeton, near the Clarke House, near the Institute for Advanced Study [who have finally bowed to protests and will not be developing acres of that sacred battlefield.]

Soon we can attend the annual re-enactment at Washington’s Crossing on the Delaware below New Hope.  There might be enough water in our river, after all, despite this serious drought year.  People who live near major rivers know truths despite increasing insistence that global warming is a myth.  For awhile, it looked as though this year’s Re-enactors would have to walk across.

Without the Delaware River, and her bounty of shad, according to Founding Fish author John McPhee, which fed our meagerly-clad-and-nourished officers in winter quarters, WE WOULD NOT HAVE A NATION.

Because of the Delaware River, we are the only state with three coastlines — the Shore, The River, and the Delaware Bay.  Vital Philadelphia and our own Capitol would not exist without the Delaware,  Yet, she is never safe.

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Coursing Waters, High Water, Delaware River by Brenda Jones

LISTEN TO THE DELAWARE RIVERKEEPER, HERE, AND ACT ACCORDINGLY.  Her level of commitment, devotion, and willing to sacrifice and risk, is Revolutionary.  Let Maya be our model, every one of us!

LISTEN TO MAYA.  FOLLOW HER BLOG.  IT’S TIME THAT EACH OF US BECOMES A Delaware Riverkeeper, a keeper of all rivers, of all natural beauty and the creatures — including humans — who require safe habitat in order to thrive.   cfe
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    Maya van Rossum

    Maya K. van Rossum is the Delaware Riverkeeper & leader for the Delaware Riverkeeper Network. Learn more www.delawareriverkeeper.org

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    MARVELS OF THE WINTER BEACH, Phase 1

    NJWILDBEAUTY readers know that my favorite time to be almost anywhere is when most people aren’t.  Give me “too early”, “too late” and especially “out-of-season”!  Except, that –especially for the Intrepids — there is no “out of season” in New Jersey!

    DECEMBER STILL LIFE — BARNEGAT BAY — REED’S ROAD — ISLAND BEACH

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    Birds’ Restaurant – Last Leaves of Autumn, Ripe Fruit of Winter

    Intrepids Jeanette Hooban and Bill Rawlyk and I met fine-art photographers Angela Previte and her husband, Bob, and the redoubtable Ray Yeager, last Sunday, for an extended Barnegat Bayside breakfast.  Fellowship reigned supreme, until our photographers “had promises to keep”

     

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    Barnegat Bay Breakfast-Time, December

     

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    Dock Outfitters with Cafe, Seaside Heights

     

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    Barnegat-Bayside Table, Dock Outfitters, Seaside Heights, NJ

     

    Jeanette, Bill and I set off to bird the day away.  Indeed, it was December, but there’s no better time to stroll Reed’s Road, just around the corner from Seaside Park, barely into Island Beach State Park.

     

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    New Moss of December!

     

    In no time, we were deep in a forested glade, silvery sugar sand underfoot, seemingly new moss burgeoning on both sides.  Beach heather, Hudsonia tomentosa, and lichens vied for our attention.

     

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    Iconic Sugar Dand Trail, Reed’s ‘Road’, Island Beach State Park

     

    There is nothing silkier than the normal, natural sand that forms Reed’s Road, nothing more alluring to the foot(e).  Although well into the twelfth month, autumn’s palette erupted first on one side, then another.

     

     

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    October in December, Reed’s Road Forest, Island Beach, New Jersey

     

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    Native, Natural Sugar Sand — LIGHT YEARS beyond Army-Corps-of-Engineers Imported Harsh Yellow Hideous Sand!

     

    There is nothing more irresistible than the tranquillity of Barnegat Bay, like an enormous silver platter, beckoning, beckoning to the west.

     

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    Sugar Sand Trail to Barnegat Bay, Reed’s Road, Island Beach, NJ

     

    There wasn’t a breath of wind.  Waves were delicate, hushed.  Black sparkling swathes of garnet particles beckoned, underfoot and underwater.  Off in the far distance, we could just peek at (but not photograph) Barnegat Light.

     

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    Crushed Garnets in Barnegat Bay Wavelets and Foam

     

    We could have found cedar waxwing and robin flocks, as many have on this trek in previous high winter walks.  Or pine warblers in early spring.  Or stately swans in other Novembers.  This day, our bird stars were the merry bobbing buffleheads, making us laugh out loud in delight.

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    Spotting Buffleheads from Reed’s Road Trail

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    Dapper Bufflehead Male by Brenda Jones (on Carnegie Lake!)

     

    The maddening part of that excursion was that some officials in our misguided 21st Century equate slashing with trail maintenance.  We spent a long time picking up their debris, mourning over literal ‘greenstick fractures’ in towering native shrubs of all species on all sides, apologizing to nature yet again for man’s depredations.  We wanted to go straight to the State House with our fury, were it not that politicians have other issues on their minds right now.  Obviously shrubs’ and trees’ health, shrub and tree rights are very low on Trenton ‘totem poles’ of interest and respect.  Citizens’ rights don’t seem very far ahead in terms of honor.  WE THE PEOPLE have a right to our native species’ being protected everywhere, and MOST ESPECIALLY IN OUR STATE PARKS!

     

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    Even the Weeds of Reeds Road Majestic, When Left to Their Own Devices!

     

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    DAMAGE in the Guise of Trail Maintenance, Reed’s Road, Island Beach, NJ

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    Pillage in the Wake of Trail “Maiantenance”, Reed’s Road, Island Beach State Park, New Jersey

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    After Reed’s Road was “Maintained” by the Vicious

    NJWILDBEAUTY readers have ‘heard’ me go on and on about reading “This Changes Evetything”, by today’s Rachel Carson: Naomi Klien.  She’s won the Sydney Peace Award from Australia, comparable to the Nobel — for her courageous expose of the multi-national, mega-funded organizations devoted to climate change denial. 

    Central to the paradigm of these planet-destroyers is downright hatred of Nature, a vicious delight (obediently promulgated by the Weather Channel) in blaming every storm on so-called Mother Nature, terming even Hurricane Sandy – the anthropogenic disaster of all time — “Mother Nature’s Revenge.”  Face it, watchers and listeners.  These terms ascribing rage and revenge to the magnificent nature that surrounds us are utilized to justify destruction.  Get it!

    NATURE IS EDEN.  WE ARE DRIVING OURSELVES OUT OF IT!

    Meanwhile, back in Paradise:

    Reed’s Road is home to proprietary pair of exquisite foxes, and sundry nocturnal raccoons.  Many the track did we follow.

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    “Who Walketh Here?”

     

    The animals have always known to ‘leave only footprints’.

     

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    Inverse Tracks in Crushed Garnet Sand

     

    Silence surrounded us, underfoot, overhead and out on the bay.  Beauty was everywhere, that had never been altered (until this brutal pruning session).  I am fond of saying that Island Beach has not been built on since initial development failed in the 1930’s Depression, and is pruned only by wind, sand and storms.  I’ll pretend that’s still true…

     

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    Undisturbed Forest Floor, Reed’s Road, Island Beach State Park, New Jersey

     

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    Pin Oak’s Last Gasp, Sugar Sand

     

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    TRAIL GUIDES — superfluous!

     

    REMEMBER, we can stroll these impeccable, usually unspoiled trails because this land has been preserved.  NEVER HAS IT BEEN MORE URGENT TO SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL AND NATIONAL LAND TRUSTS. 

    See to it, with your memberships, that every possible wild inch of our sacred country is preserved in perpetuity, no matter who wields what power. 

    “This land is your land.  This land is my land…” — but only due to our absolute constant courageous vigilance.

    While you can, get out into the Parks of our beleaguered state, let their unspoilt magnificence seep into and restore your souls.

     

    MARTIN MIRACLES — Purple, That is!

    First Martins On Wing Above Phrabmites

    First Martins On the Wing, Dark Phragmites Roost Site, Maurice River at Sundown

    Would you believe 500,000 to 700,000 purple martins filling the sky, above the phragmites marshes of the Maurice River?  That waterway, literally designated “Wild and Scenic”, is never more dramatic than when the martins gather prior to migration, every August.  If you’re lucky, you have tickets with dear birding friends, aboard watercraft chosen by Citizens United to Protect the Maurice River (and its Tributaries), to carry you toward a sunset miracle.  (https://www.cumauriceriver.org/)  (https://www.cumauriceriver.org/pages/maurice.html)  (http://www.mauricerivertwp.org/purplemartin.html)

    There are a couple of more sailing — use the third link above to become martin-dazzled!

    All Aboard ! Bonanza Martin Fesitval August 2016

    My Birding Buddies Board Bonanza II on Purple Martinquest

    The Maurice empties into our Delaware Bay.  Recall/realize that New Jersey is the only state with three coastlines — The Shore, The Delaware River, and the Delaware Bay.  Revolutionary Battles were fought in the vicinity of the Maurice — “Peak of the Moon” and the grisly Hancock House massacre. In Greenwich (pronounced Green Witch), there is an actual monument to the tea burners of that town, celebrated for daring to defy the British.  Several trials were mounted, not one of them successful in convicting a single burner of tea.  The names on that stone are the proudest items in Greenwich, right up there with that very early, venerable Quaker Meeting House.

    Citizens United Martin Fesitval August 2016

    Citizens United to Protect the Maurice River and Its Tributaries

    Preservation battles are increasingly being undertaken in the region — for Philadelphia “developers” — let’s face it, they’re destroyers! — would pave over the entire area that earned New Jersey its Garden State honorific.  Think tomatoes.  Think Campbell’s soup and Heinz ketchup.  They put ketchup on their breakfasts down there.  Neighbors realize you’re not local when you look surprised that they bring you Heinz’s glory for your bacon and eggs.

    Maurice River Craft

    Maurice River Scene

    The Maurice and the Cohansey are wide and shimmery, soft, even lazy.  Silence is the norm in either Salem/Cumberland County river.  A few fishing boats mutter along.  Various signs of legendary shipbuilding of yesterday become apparent as your boat carries you martin-ward on the well staffed Bonanza II.

    Maritime Realities Maurice River

    Maurice River Commerce

    You’ll have counted 8 mature American bald eagles and more than a few immatures before you’re even settled into your viewing post in the prow.  Great blue herons lift off with dignity.  Black-crowned night herons are already at roost in the heart of dark evergreens and shrubs.  These white football-shaped herons always seem to be scowling, but they’re very happy with the undisturbed habitat provided by the Maurice in August.

    Black-crowned night heron Brenda Jones

    Black-crowned Night Heron on Roost for Evening and Night by BRENDA JONES

    Your boat is filled with people from many states, and birding experts who specialize in martins.  The birds themselves will float in from four states, but not until the sun has nearly set behind those towering reeds.  We don’t know each other, but birders are never strangers for long.  The air is steamy but not oppressive.  Wavelets whisper and it’s quiet enough to hear them.  Inside the excursion boat, desserts of sweet and fruits await, and plenty of soft drinks and essential cold water.  Binoculars are everywhere.   Expectation high.

    American Eagle Millstone Aqueduct 2011 brenda jones

    American Bald Eagle in Flight by BRENDA JONES

    Legendary martin expert, –who modestly disclaims his introduction–, Allen Jackson, speaks on the microphone, then comes down to eager participants on the prow.  All evening long, he softly answers seemingly endless questions.  We learn that these martins eat in those other states, returning nightly now to the Maurice to roost in seemingly endless phragmites.  That the sky will fill with them, as with passenger pigeons long ago.  That their migratory flight could start next week, with the first northwest wind to speed them southward.  That insects are their food of choice and Brazil their 4000-miles-away destination.

    Osprey on High Sandy Hook, Brenda Jones

    Osprey in Flight by BRENDA JONES

    The river turns from wet slate to mercury.  The sun goes from yellow to orange to pink tones, then copper.  It resembles a cauldron, spilling molten copper across the water’s dimpled surface.  On the other side of the boat, the half-or-so moon is yellow, then gold, then orange.  Yet its water signature is silver.

    redwing sunset Pole Farm Brenda Jones

    Red-Winged Blackbird Singing by BRENDA JONES

    Ospreys are everywhere, –young on the nest, matures in the air, skillfully, skillfully fishing.  We don’t see any of legendary competitions between eagles and osprey, perhaps because all have had a good day on the Maurice.  Red-winged blackbirds ripple overhead like avian rivers, males and females together, feeding intensively.  Grackles perch on a complex telephone pole, and we all want them to be martins.

    900-37865474-purple-martin-in-flight

    Purple Martin in Flight from Internet

    Then Allen softly alerts us to a single martin on high. A handful.  A gathering.  A cluster.  A swarm.  As the river turns the color of smoke from a fresh campfire, phragmites reaches become the color of charcoal.  I must admit, we’re not seeing the purple of the ever increasing circling birds who choose sundown for their autumnal drama.  Charcoal-feathers-to-charcoal reeds, they soar and circle, consider landing, land, then rise again.  No longer can we count birds – until some0ne comes up with the old joke:  “Count the legs and divide by two!”

    Sky Peppered with Martins August 2016

    Sky Peppered with Martins — We had 100s to each one before dark

    Allen is rapt, gently reminding us to look right, look left, look carefully over the reeds, and, above all, gaze at the sky.  Those miraculous birds are as closely packed as pepper on pastrami, and still more are streaming in.  Two tiny boats and ours still their motors.  We are gifted with the musical chatter of the gatherers.  And then the sun seems to drop like toast pulled into a toaster, and it’s all over until tomorrow.

    By next week, Allen announces, there could be a million.  They will roost on both sides of the Maurice then, awaiting that weather front, that essential northwest wind that begins their migration, and ends martin miracles in New Jersey for another year.

    Never forget, as I remind and remind you re land in our state — neither the martins nor the humans would have had this night’s experience, were it not for dedicated preservationists.  Support Citizens United to Save the Maurice River.  Support your local land trusts, wherever you live.

    Nature is paramount.  Nature herself is endangered.  Do everything you can to keep her, and her magnificent creatures. safe.

    Preliminaries to the skyful of martins:

    Oyster Shipping Bivalve

    Bivalve, where there were more millionaires per block than anywhere in the world, because of oysters

    Oyster Shipping Sheds Bivalve

    Oyster Heyday Images As We Prepared to Board the Bonanza II

    Oyster Cracker Cafe Port Norris

    The Oyster Cracker Cafe, Port Norris, NJ

    RR Car Port Norris NJ

    Restored RR Car That Carried the Oysters Very Far from Bivalve, NJ

    Trawl Tank Port Norris

    Trawl Tank at Bivalve/Port Norris

    Gulls' Bivalves Martin Fesitval August 2016

    Gulls’ Bivalve Experience

    Lift-Off Port Norris

    Gull Lift-Off at Bivalve – probably spooked by a raptor

    Nautical Still Life Port Norris

    Nautical Still Life: Port Norris/Bivalve Dock

     

    HeronMillstoneSNOW1-17-11DSC_5656

    Great Blue Heron by BRENDA JONES — The Heron in Winter…

     

     

     

     

     

     

    “HOME OF THE FREE, BECAUSE OF THE BRAVE…” Memorial Day Thoughts

    SEE NAOMI KLEIN WINS SYDNEY PEACE PRIZE – A.M. AFTER I POSTED THIS BLOG, below

    This scene from Chatham, Massachusetts, which I call “Tethered Steeple” could also be titled “Tethered Flag.”  This morning I passed the Lawrenceville Volunteer Fire Department, en route home from having kayaked to the Fishing Bridge and back.  Our firemen had created their Memorial Day sign:  “HOME OF THE FREE, BECAUSE OF THE BRAVE.”

    Tethered Tower  Chatham Scenes 002

    Tethered Tower, Chatham, Mass.

    Regular NJWILDBEAUTY readers know my grave concern for citizens’ rights in our land.  My immediate thought, upon seeing that noble firehouse sign this morning was, “Well, they all seem to have died in vain.”

    1 1776 1876 Flag

    1776 1876 American Flag from Internet

    I worry a great deal about what our Founding Fathers must think of vanished liberty in so-called America.  About everyone’s being treated as a criminal in airports, and now even in museums and theatres (Manhattan, not yet in Princeton).

    Lawrenceville Fire Department 002

    Lawrenceville Fire Department Mailbox

    I am particularly devastated that land, –even that preserved in perpetuity-, is being punctured already with PIPELINE pipes of hideous yellow – color of 21st-Century tyranny.

    Pipeline Precursor D&R Canal Princeton July 2013 038

    PIPELINE: “We have met the enemy, and he is …” Fossil Fuel Corporations.

    This land is no longer OUR LAND, as the lovely song insisted when we were fighting our own government to end the Vietnam War.  “…and all around us, a voice was singing, this land was made for you and me.”       Reality seems to me, “this land was made for fossil fuels!”

    Cape May Half-Mast Christmas 2015

    Cape May Point Flag at Half Mast in Gale

    The fossil fuel industry would have it otherwise, as would many so-called ecological organizations, significantly funded by those whose motto is “Drill, Baby, Drill!”, (referred to by the brilliant author, Naomi Klein, as ‘Big Green.’  (This Changes Everything — Capitalism vs. the Climate”.)

    Bayhead Flag in April April wind 2016

    Bay Head New Jersey Flag at Ocean where Sandy Landed, in high wind of April 2016

    I don’t know what the rest of you do to counter these dire trends.  What would George and Ben and John and Abigail and Thomas (Paine) and Thomas (Jefferson) have done, faced with the restrictions and constrictions of liberty in our times?

    Borden's Towne

    Nearby Town of Revolutionary Fervor, including only home owned by the rightfully fiery Thomas Paine

    Please note how many of my excursion pictures seem to be taken in high winds…  We should stop blaming the situation of ‘climate change’, and begin accurately targeting fossil fuel magnates, politicians bought by them, the organizations founded by and funded by them, who permit the continued ruination of our country, our Planet.

    Chatham Light Storm-blown Flag jpg

    Chatham Light and Flag in Wild Pre-Storm Wind, 2015

    Memorial Day used to be called ‘Decoration Day.’  It was created to honor Civil War dead, and there were supposedly two different such days, — one for the North and one for the South.  Somehow they were, –after a suitable lapse of time–, merged into Memorial Day.

    Maine Cemetery Old Headstones

    Maine Cemetery, Harpswell, Old Headstones in Late Light

    As children, families went to the family graveyards, honoring deceased relatives.  We did not, but many did, [and in Salem and Cumberland Counties of New Jersey, many still do], have a memorial meal at the grave site.  When we visited, we cleaned the graves, weeded, watered, brought new flowers, and parents reminisced.  Our ancestors lived on through these rituals.

    O Say Can You See at Chatham Fish Pier

    “O, Say, Can You See?” at Chatham Fish Pier, October 2015

    Turns out we were ‘doing it wrong,’, as this day is supposed to be about honoring those who died in war for our country.

    1 Starry Stars Flag

    Starry Stars “Old Glory” from Internet

    Lawrenceville Fire Department 015

    Land of the Free, Home of the Brave – Lawrenceville’s 9/11 Heroes

    “HOME OF THE FREE, BECAUSE OF THE BRAVE.”

    Let’s KEEP it that way.  Write legislators, editors, heads of ruinous Fossil Fuel organizations.  There is a Women’s movement, called “Take Back the Night.”

    We need to pledge OUR lives, OUR fortunes, OUR sacred honor, if there is any such entity in these troubled times.

    We need a TAKE BACK OUR COUNTRY mentality.  Our land needs to be OUR land again.

    Beekman Arms Flags Rhinebeck NY

    Full Glory, Rhinebeck NY: Beekman Arms Inn and Tavern – Oldest Continuously Operating in America – since Pre-Revolutionary Days

     

    Naomi Klein awarded 2016 Sydney Peace Prize.

    We are very proud to share the news that Naomi has been awarded the 2016 Sydney Peace Prize by the Sydney Peace Foundation.

    Naomi will be travelling to Sydney, Australia in November to accept the award and attend an array of events organised by the Sydney Peace Foundation.

    Tickets to her award speech at the Sydney Town Hall on November 11th are available here.

    We hope this will be a powerful opportunity to continue to bring conversations around social justice and climate change into the discourse in Australia as well as support the work of social movements across the region.

    We extend our heartfelt congratulations to Naomi and look forward to welcoming her to Australia in November.

    Edward Said London Lecture

    Fossil fuels require sacrifice zones: they always have. And you can’t have a system built on sacrificial places and sacrificial people unless intellectual theories that justify their sacrifice exist and persist: from Manifest Destiny to Terra Nullius to Orientalism, from backward hillbillies to backward Indians. – Naomi Klein Edward Said London Lecture May 2016.

    On May 3rd Naomi delivered the Edward Said London Lecture – if you haven’t had a chance yet I urge you to read or watch her powerful address.

    In solidarity,
    Alex for This Changes Everything team

    Copyright © 2016 This Changes Everything, All rights reserved.
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    Our So-Called Governor

    Old Glory Flies above PRESERVED East Point Light on the Imperiled Delaware Bayshore

    East Point Light and Flag May 2015

    East Point Light and Flag, Delaware Bayshore

     

    I’m saying it like it is.  My NJWILDBEAUTY readers have ‘heard’ me in other posts, lamenting the lack of true liberty in our land.  Noting that the more our government prates of ‘liberty’ and names airports for that lost reality, the more it harps on ‘security’, the less we have of either.

    I need someone wise to explain to me, “Whatever happened to democracy?”

    I don’t know whether we’re under oligarchy or tyranny, but whatever it IS is the opposite of everything for which our Founding Fathers/Sisters/Mothers pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor.  From melting the pewter to make bullets, to writing and signing the Declaration of Independence, they ‘screwed their courage to the sticking place.’

    And we echo T.S. Eliot — we are expected to let officials “teach us to be and not to be, teach us to sit still…”

    NO!

    OK, –everyone who cares about wild beauty anywhere–, what are you going to do about this?  Write me.  Tell me what you will do to turn around this travesty of government:

    [reminder, open land is the ultimate carbon sink… hence the Categories re climate change…]

    Contacts: Ed Potosnak, (732) 991-7574

    May 23, 2016                                                                                      Kelly Mooij, (732) 539-1693

     

    ESSENTIAL PRESERVATION PROGRAMS REMAIN UNFUNDED AS GOVERNOR DENIES VOTERS’ WILL AND CONDITIONALLY VETOES OPEN SPACE LEGISLATION

    TRENTON, NJ—Governor Christie conditionally vetoed S969/A780, the Preserve New Jersey Act, which would have provided the authorization and guidance to begin funding state, county, local and non-profit open space, farmland, and historic preservation programs consistent with the constitutional amendment passed in 2014 with 65 percent of voters’ support. After the Governor pocket vetoed implementation language at the end of last session, both houses of the Legislature prioritized this bill, and passed it again this year with strong bipartisan support.

    “We are appalled by the Governor’s disregard for the will of voters,” said Ed Potosnak, Chair of Keep It Green. “By conditionally vetoing this legislation, the Governor guaranteed New Jersey’s important Green Acres, Farmland Preservation, and Historic Preservation programs will continue to be denied voter-dedicated funds to preserve lands that protect our drinking water, grow Jersey Fresh produce, create community parks, and preserve our historic sites,” he continued.

    “The reliability and predictability of funding, which voters supported and which would have been achieved if the bill had been signed, is central to the success of these programs,” said Kelly Mooij, Coordinator of Keep It Green. “Without this legislation, preservation programs have had to delay or cut important projects and the State will be unable to develop long-term, strategic plans for wise investment. This flies in the face of the original purpose of the amendment, the well-established history of the program and could severely hurt the State in the long run,” Mooij continued.

    Governor Christie’s veto memo noted his desire for greater ‘flexibility’ in the budgeting process and less “granular” detail from the Legislature.

    “The Legislature has now twice put this bill on the Governor’s desk and he has vetoed and conditionally vetoed this critical legislation because he wants ‘flexibility’,” said Ed Potosnak, Chair of Keep It Green. “This rationale is offensive to New Jerseyans who constitutionally dedicated these funds to preserve open space, farmland, and historic sites and to support stewardship programs. The voters supported the constitutional dedication in order to ensure funding wasn’t subject to the year-to-year whims of politicians,” Potosnak explained.

    In FY2016, when no implementation language was passed, the Governor improperly used voter- dedicated funds to pay for park staff salaries, even after the Legislature removed authorizing language from his proposed budget and identified a different funding source. He has once again proposed using the funds for salaries this year.

    “Both chambers of the Legislature rejected Governor Christie’s proposal to divert open space funds to plug holes in the DEP’s budget because it is inconsistent with the intent of voters,” said Potosnak. “These funds are supposed to go to programs that preserve lands that protect our drinking water, grow some of the best produce in the world, and ensure our history is passed down to future generations. Without the guidance provided by the language in the Preserve New Jersey Act, Governor Christie raided the funds in FY2016 and is brazenly trying to use the funds for the same purpose again this year, which only reinforces the need for this legislation,” he continued.

    The Governor also criticized the lack of specifically enumerated funding for Blue Acres in the three year funding bill, despite the fact that Green Acres funds can be used to fund Blue Acres projects and that sufficient funds remain in the Blue Acres programs for buy-outs to continue at the current rate until the legislation sunsets.

    “Blue Acres funding is a critical part of the preservation program and must be included in the long-term investment portfolio of the State. This implementation legislation would have provided guidance for disbursement of the CBT funds for the next three years only. At the current rate of buy-outs, the Blue Acres program will not run out of funding before this legislation sunsets.” Said Kelly Mooij.

    “The Governor is being disingenuous when he says Blue Acres is absent from this bill. He knows, or should know, the Green Acres funding included within this allocation can be used for Blue Acres projects. Additionally, when the CBT dedication increases from 4% to 6%, as supported by the voters in 2014, additional funds will become available. A portion of that increase should be dedicated to Blue Acres,” added Ed Potosnak

    In the more than 50 years of these legacy preservation programs, detailed implementation language has always accompanied or followed the dedication of new funds.  Every previous Governor, Republican and Democrat, who was presented with implementing legislation, signed the bills.

    “The Governor has, in an unprecedented fashion, ignored the will of the voters and rejected the bipartisan effort put forth by the Legislature to reliably, transparently and predictably provide funding for vital preservation programs,” said Mooij. “We plan to investigate all options to ensure the constitutionally-dedicated monies are released to fund these critical programs as the overwhelming majority of New Jerseyans intended,” she concluded.

    About New Jersey Keep It Green: New Jersey Keep It Green is a coalition of more than 180 park and conservation organizations working to create a long-term, dedicated source of funding for the preservation and stewardship of New Jersey’s natural areas, waterways, parks, farmland and historic sites. NJ Keep It Green led successful campaigns to pass statewide ballot measures in 2006, 2007, and 2009 generating $600 million for state open space, farmland and historic preservation programs. In 2014, NJ Keep It Green led a successful campaign that supports sustained, long-term funding for preservation and stewardship. For more information or to sign the NJ Keep It Green Statement of Support, visit http://www.njkeepitgreen.org.

    This follows my signature at work.  Perhaps those who rule our country now, the new versions of King George III, are dead set against the whole world’s being ‘kin’.

    “One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.”

               William Shakespeare

    SIGN UP FOR FRIENDS OF THE EARTH & SAVE THE PLANET

    Morning on Barnegat Bay Island Beach April 2016

    Exquisite, Now Healthy, Barnegat Bay, thanks to Preservationists / Environmentalists

    Some of you surely wonder why I’ve spent 11 going on 12 years at D&R Greenway Land Trust, at this phase of my life, and, yes, so poorly recompensed.  The answer is, my life mission has become to save the Planet.

    New Dune Grass Bayhead April 2016

    New Dune, New Dune Grass, Protecting Beloved Bay Head, New Jersey, April 2016

    If you ever check me out on Facebook, that’s basically the only kind of ‘posting’ I do.  Once friends and I fought with minimal success to save Kingson’s Princeton Nursery Land from being sold and developed through Princeton University, into what was Villas of Tuscany and is now Barclay Square.  Hundreds of towering dwellings went in, where magnificent trees used to thrive, and so close to our Canal – drinking water for thousands locally  These condos are visible from the D&R Canal and Towpath, which is absolutely forbidden – and yet, and yet… significant exceptions were made.  The developers had the Princeton Nursery Lands deemed officially ‘nonhistoric’, triumphantly showing the signed and sealed document at a critical hearing concerning ‘Villas of Tuscany.’  ‘Nonhistoric’ although Washington had marched there with his barefoot troops after the first Revolutionary Victories, the two in Trenton and the one in Princeton; then, again, en route to crucial Monmouth and yet another win.  Abraham Lincoln rode the Camden and Amboy Railroad through that land en route to his Inauguration and his grave.  The Princeton Nurseries were the finest in America and some say in the world in its day.  The Canal, Towpath and that railroad defined New Jersey, determined its essential towns.  You can see the Barclay Square dwellings, symbol of our defeat, when down in a kayak on the water.

    I mourned, just before that distant meeting over on the Delaware River (so no one could attend the hearing without taking precious scarce vacation days to be there) to one of the fellow protestors, whom I didn’t even know: “But I’m a poet.  What am I doing at the barricades?!?”

    His answer propels almost everything I do these days, including walking into D&R Greenway in 2006 and saying, “Am I supposed to work with you?”

    “Carolyn,” this stranger answered on the phone, “The barricades — that is where poets belong!”

    First Kayak D&R Canal at Alexander Rd May 2015

    Heading South from Alexander, 5 to 6:30 on a golden Sunday evening

    This serenity is the norm on the D&R Canal, except where Barclay Square looms.  We did manage to save enough land to create a preserve, carefully watched over by the Friends of Princeton Nursery Lands.  My heroic fellow barricade-contenders in that long-ago fight are still in the forefront of saving and keeping Kingston and its sacred Revolutionary War and Industrial and Canal and Towpath and even Camden and Amboy Railroad sites as safe as they can possibly be from rapacious developers.  We have Karen Linder, Anne Zeman, Mark Peel, Tari Pantaleo and Robert von Zumbusch to thank for Kingston successes.  In fact, join Friends of Princeton Nursery Lands whether you ever set foot(e) in Kingston or not — for that canal and that river flow into the Raritan, its sacred Bay, and the sea, mantle of our blue planet.

    GreatEgretfishing8-12-09

    Great Egret Fishing the D&R Canal,  by Brenda Jones

    The following thank you note just came in from Friends of the Earth.  The 21st Century can seem so hopeless, climate-wise, Planet-wise.  But small acts by committed people, as Margaret Mead asserts, are still changing the world.  “Indeed, this is the only thing that ever has,” she continues.  Read this.  Sign up of Friends for the Earth yourselves, financially and electronically.  Let’s prove all the skeptics wrong and save our Planet.

    Read the effects of courageous acts by committed people, 21st-Century paradigm changers:

    (bolds mine)   cfe

    Dear Carolyn Foote,

    I was just thinking about all we’ve achieved together in the past few months and I wanted to thank you for making it happen. Your activism makes a difference!

    In fact, the activism of Friends of the Earth members like you in Maryland was crucial to passing the nation’s first law to ban bee-killing pesticides. Without your emails, phone calls, and in-person meetings with local legislators, the law wouldn’t have passed. Now, it’s time to take the fight to other states with similar bills on the table — and build momentum for national action on bee-killing pesticides.

    On the national level, you’ve driven progress in our work to keep fossil fuels in the ground. The White House recently put a moratorium on all new coal leasing — which you helped make happen by signing petitions and writing to the President. 

    And that’s not all — the Obama Administration has also postponed five oil and gas lease sales — taking a total of 125,136 acres of public land off the table for now. We’re gaining momentum thanks to the constant drumbeat from people like you telling President Obama to protect our public lands and climate. But we won’t stop until the President keeps ALL our fossil fuels in the ground.

    By taking action online and in your community, you are saving bees and butterflies. You’re preventing the worst impacts of climate chaos. From local victories to progress on national issues, you’re driving our work forward. So thank you for all you’ve done, and keep up the good work!

    Thanks for being a Friend of the Earth.

    Warm Regards,
    Erich Pica,

    President,
    Friends of the Earth

     

     

     

    “Sarah Palin Says It’s All My Fault” and Other Political Poems

    American Flag at Stern of the Twilight Steamboat on the Mississippi

    American Flag at Stern of the Twilight Steamboat on the Mississippi

    When friends and I were furiously fighting with Princeton University to preserve the hallowed Princeton Nursery Lands in Kingston, I lamented to one of them that night, “But I’m a poet!  What am I doing at the barricades?”

    The friend brilliantly retorted, “But Carolyn, poets BELONG at the barricades.”

    I returned, chastened, to the battle.  Ultimately, we saved a handful of acres, and the Friends of Princeton Nursery Lands was formed and thrives, leading informative trail walks, planting Flemer Nursery trees, sponsoring annual clean-ups, such as the very successful recent one on Martin Luther King Day.  FPNL aims to restore the classic nursery buildings, stalled now by insufficient fundings.  NJWILBEAUTY readers can assist by going onto the FPNL website and donating, and coming to their enriching events.

    In the intervening years, in amongst nature poems, which I share with NJWILDBEAUTY readers, I have increasingly written political poems.

    My fury over the indifference of politicians to the plight of the planet, results in my deciding to share some of the more radical political poems of recent years with my readers.

    “Sarah Palin Says It’s All My Fault” won on-line publication at the time of the Gulf Oil Spill.  Now politicians, including the the President we thought knew better and would prevent profanation of the planet, want to drill for oil off-shore, in already imperiled New Jersey, and also puncture her north, south, east, west and especially the Pine Barrens for the spoils of Fracking!

    Do what you can, readers, with your legislators, wherever you live, to arrest despoilation of the Planet.  

    Pipeline! Along D&R Canal south of Princeton, Our Historic Bucolic Waterway, Our Water SUPPLY!

    Pipeline! Along D&R Canal south of Princeton, Our Historic Bucolic Waterway, Our Water SUPPLY!

    Here’s my Sarah Poem.

    POETS FOR LIVING WATERS

    Creating venues for poetry in support of healthy ocean communities

    DEAR SARAH PALIN, by Carolyn Foote Edelmann

    Posted on June 21, 2010 by Heidi Lynn Staples

    DEAR SARAH PALIN,

    I understand it’s all my fault
    –this Gulf oil disaster, I mean–
    not only all that fire
    bodies catapulted into air
    then drowned
    soon likely shark bait
    but also this volcano of oil
    spewing interminably
    into our blue mantle

    Sarah, you say
    I did this
    all of this and more
    now some six weeks ago
    with no end in sight
    and no businessman
    politician not even a general
    let alone you, Sarah Palin,
    knows how to stop
    this tornado of oil

    it’s also my fault, the oiled birds
    Northern gannets
    –pristine as Josephine
    in her Empire gown
    frail white silk
    adorned with gold
    though not quite bees
    dark eyes snapping
    as she becomes increasingly encased
    in ‘my’ oil
    more abruptly than all those mastodons
    in La Brea’s tar pits

    now slender cormorants
    who, everyone is sure, are drowning
    as they swim along
    neck barely afloat
    no one realizing
    the genius of cormorants
    who can fly/swim 30 miles an hour
    underwater
    when they are not oiled

    about the mpg of my car
    my old car
    for the ownership of which
    I am quite guilty
    for the replacement of which
    I have no means

    cormorants
    must wave both wings
    after every dive
    to dry them
    so that they may
    dive and dive again
    –no wave strong enough
    to shake off ceaseless poison weight
    of oil

    it’s my fault, the reddish egrets
    you know his own epitaph
    written by photographer Ted Cross
    for his own recent death
    describing his multi-faceted self
    on the Other Side
    “still searching for the perfect photograph
    of the reddish egret”

    Ted did not have in mind
    this soiled oiled specimen
    trying, unsuccessfully
    to lift newly leaden
    legs wings and feet
    out of Gulf mud muck and oil

    it’s all my fault
    and not because I use the wrong lightbulbs
    in a couple of fixtures
    nor because I do turn on the heat.
    inside, in winter, sometimes
    although I’ve been doing without air
    conditioning so far this troubled year

    it’s my fault
    because I am an “extreme environmentalist”
    because I think there should never be any more
    drilling for oil in our country
    because I deplore petrotyrrany
    the privatization of profits
    socialization of poverty
    because I think we should start with the auto companies

    well, what do you expect, Sarah?
    I grew up in Detroit

    I’ve never seen a wolf in the wild
    as you do and deplore
    –these beings you condemn to bloody deaths
    I would embrace

    nor have I encountered
    a single polar bear
    let alone a starving female trying to find food
    for her new brood
    attempting to swim with them
    toward vanishing ice floes

    but that’s o.k. with you
    Sarah
    it makes the hunting
    easier

    it’s my fault, Sarah
    for I am quite literally
    a tree hugger

    I believe that greed should end
    America return to her original nobility
    where people pledged lives
    fortunes
    sacred honor
    remember sacred honor?
    — ah, well, probably not, Sarah

    I believe we are our Planet’s
    Keepers

    Sarah – who are you?

    ~~~~~~~~~~

    STATEMENT
    what everyone must remember, wherever anyone lives (not only those of us in New Jersey’s key migratory corridor, the only state with three coastlines) is that these are our birds, our waters.  Because of the Gulf Stream, this catastrophe is global.  We may have passed the tipping point.  We are all the oiled pelican.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    OK, that’s not the only political poem these days:

     

    SHIP OF STATE

     

    Roosevelt died again

    — I can’t help it!

    I keep reading histories/

    biographies of WWII

     

    and he’s there

    at the helm

    jaunty, sure

    eyes all asparkle

    despite Depression

    war-on-two fronts

    cigarette slanted

    in that elegant holder

    easy at the wheel

     

    no circling shadows yet

    dim those piercing eyes – nothing

    forces the wide and reassuring grin

    from that dashing face

    — emblem of my childhood

     

    he can sail forever

    circumnavigate

    this imperiled globe

    that was so much less imperiled

    in his hands

     

    CAROLYN FOOTE EDELMANN

    January 2015

     

    Here may be my most radical ever.  I see Edward Snowden right up there with our Founding Fathers and Thomas Paine, yes, at the barricades, willing to give lives, fortunes and sacred honor so that our noble country can live, thrive, and persist.

     

    Pole Farm, Lawrenceville NJ, America The Beautiful

    Pole Farm, Lawrenceville NJ, America The Beautiful

     

    REVOLUTIONARY HEROISM, 21ST CENTURY

     

    I understand you, Edward Snowden

    you find a country

    notorious for terrorism

    safer

    than your own

     

    you love your own

    enough

    to fight for its return

    to sacred honor

    blood-won rights

    –privacy above all

     

    you love your own

    enough to give her up

    hoping

    that your sacrifice

    will turn around

    our country’s

    despoilation / ruination

     

    I understand you

    praise your courage

     

    wonder what it is that I can do

    to turn the tide

     

    CAROLYN FOOTE EDELMANN

    January 2015

     

    Preserved Farm, Essential America, Salem County NJ

    Preserved Farm, Essential America, Salem County NJ

    SOMETIMES, BIRDERS STRIKE OUT – Intrepids in Quest of Sandhill Cranes

    Jeanette Birding Near the Delaware & Raritan Canal

    Jeanette Birding Near the Delaware & Raritan Canal

    Friends had seen the cranes.  The SANDHILL cranes.  In nearby Franklin Township.

    Friends had seen them two days in a row!

    Jeanette Hooban (One of The Intrepids) and I have never seen a crane.

    Now, admittedly, in the pictures sent by friends from cell phones, those birds didn’t look all that impressive. Rather dowdy, even dingy, lumpen, although on tall legs — they were not what Michelin (Guides to gastronomic shrines in France) calls “Worthy of the Journey.”

    But then, we’d never seen a crane.

    Well, except in (the film) Winged Migration, but sandhills are not the ones who starred in that epic.

    So we devoted an overcast Sunday to going on a cranequest.

    End of the Trail, Rose and Other Gardens of Colonial Park, NJ

    End of the Trail, Rose and Other Gardens of Colonial Park, NJ

    Odd back roads tumbled us out in one of the most nightmarish developments I had ever seen.  It was like those prophetic films, such as 2001, in which man irrevocably pays ultimate prices for progress.

    Scraped earth, denuded of trees and even of crops, McMansion “TownHomes” everywhere, without a shrub, without even being alternated for privacy.  A moonscape, but I wouldn’t insult the moon.

    Somewhere near what I mockingly called “an enclave”, and then it turns out that’s the name of that place, coupled with my treasured (nearby but by means visible) Delaware and Raritan Canal.

    The road of the cranes was only slightly removed from destruction in the name of construction.

    Cranes need slightly cropped ex-cornfields.

    There was one.

    As we drove along, Jeanette and I began to wonder if we’d even recognize a crane, if we came upon them.

    She decided they MIGHT look something like great blue herons, and we well know those stately birds.

    Heron Giving Voice Brenda Jones

    GREAT BLUE HERON BY BRENDA JONES

    So Jeanette drove with infinite patience, the patience of a brain surgeon, slowly down, then up, then down and up again, the road of the cranes.

    There may be nothing emptier than cornrows where there ought to be birds.

    Dark-eyedJunco-BaldpateMountain2-22-12DSC_3517

    DARK-EYED JUNCO BY BRENDA JONES

    Finally, we rejoiced to come upon, not in the corn, but in the natural weeds and scrub that bordered the croplands, some sparrows, a few juncoes, two mouning doves, all busily gleaning seeds flung down, not by a farmer on his tractor, but by the wind in the plants that belong on that field.

    Song Sparrow from blind Brenda Jones

    SONG SPARROW BY BRENDA JONES

    So we drove away.

    We thought we could find a back road along the backside of the cornfield.  Ha!  Everything up there belongs to those enclave developers.  And their hideosities are for sale “in the high $300,000s”, according to their industrial-strength sign, stuck in the bare earth.  A Mercedes turned into the Sales Office ahead of us, as we made our disbelieving way into this panorama of the future.

    But Jeanette had stopped that car!  No, not to buy a condo.  To study a handsome, stately, piercingly gazing red-tailed hawk in a tree the developers had somehow overlooked.

    With our magical optics, we could see the abruptly changed expression in that red-tail’s lemon-yellow eyes.  With a whoosh!, he was up and over, and o my! there was some forgotten grass on some lumpen ground.  The hawk ‘stooped’, (birder-language for zeroing on for the kill) and vanished behind a hummock.

    red-tail lunch D&R Canal Princeton Brenda Jones

    RED-TAILED HAWK BY BRENDA JONES

    Jeanette said, impishly, “Shall we very slowly drive over there and watch it tear the prey from limb to limb?”

    Listen, I’ll take any bird experience.

    But before I could even nod, let alone verbalize, that hawk was back in the tree.

    Raptorial fast food.

    Because were there in the presence of his majesty, and there was no way we were leaving before he did, we then treated to a cloud of juncoes, flaring white petticoats.  And then, lo, bluebirds beyond counting!  They were so brightly blue and that almost-robin red, for they are cousins, and even the females so vivid, we decided they were halfway to indigo buntings.

    BluebirdColdSoilRd3-10-12DSC_4449

    BLUEBIRD IN WINTER BY BRENDA JONES

    The aforesaid developers had put in a scraggly array of rather meagre trees.  I hope they did it in early fall, not in November.  But these trees did not look grounded.

    And across the road, near the raptor feast site, an array of handsome, tall trees lay scattered, dirt balls facing the road and the $300,000+ mchouses.  They looked like toys abandoned by a petulant toddler. They did not look like they are going to survive January blasts and worse, without having been put in the ground in plenty of time to establish strong roots.  Even so, the few scraggly trees were fine for the bluebirds, who merrily filled them, like bright Christmas ornaments, then float-coasted down to the ground for seeds or whatever. There surely aren’t any insects or worms about in this vile weather we’ve been enduring.

    Not only that, a merry mockingbird crowned the tree like an angel, then flew to the top of one of the mcroofs.

    Mockingbird at Sunset in Winter

    MOCKINGBIRD PUFFED BY WINTER COLD  BY BRENDA JONES

    Just then, ‘our’ red-tail took off in a zoom, rising effortlessly toward something we hadn’t noticed.  God forbid a field or a habitat should be left to the mice and the voles and the butterflies and the bees and foxes and maybe even a coyote or two, and some skunks, some raccoons.  Trails, even, so the people can get out of those “little houses made of Ticky Tack” which Pete Seeger so scorned, Seeger-the-prophet.

    Untitled

    FOX OF ISLAND BEACH, IN DAYLIGHT, BY RAY YEAGER

    (what SHOULD be happening in the fields of Franklin Park)

    No, there isn’t a field.  Well, yes there IS, actually.

    A playing field.

    With towering bleachers and blinding shiny metal poles taller then anything in the enclave, each one studded with equally blinding shiny metal hooded lights, that will ruin the nights of the people who attempt to sleep in the enclave.  Who have no idea how blinding such lights can be in the dark, nor how loudly players and fans will carry on under those lights…

    Well, the hawk was nothing if not an opportunist.  No tree in New Jersey that I’ve ever seen is as tall as those lightning-blinding metal poles.  Straight to the top he flew, master of all he surveyed.  No prey would be missed by this master.

    Jeanette and I went on over to the Colonial Park Rose Garden, to see what it’s like for roses in winter.

    Entrance Rose Garden Colonial Park January 2015

    ROY ANDRES DE GOOT MEMORIAL ROSE GARDEN

    Unusual.  Strangely beautiful.  Gripping sometimes, especially among fragrant herbs, some still green:Winter Green  Roses at Rose Garden Colonial Park January 2015

    Winterberry Bounty Rose Garden Colonial Park January 2015

    WINTERBERRY BOUNTY

    Julia Child Roses in Winter Rose Garden Colonial Park January 2015

    THIS ONE’S FOR FOOD WRITERS PAT TANNER AND FAITH BAHADURIAN AND POET BETTY LIES —

    MY CO-JULIA-FANS

    Roses in Winter Rose Garden Colonial Park January 2015

    THE LONG VIEW

    But for this preservationist, who spends the majority of her time trying to convince people to appreciate and save natural New Jersey, it was winter in my heart.

    Sure-footed mammal tracks Rose Garden Colonial Park January 2015

    SURE-FOOTED MAMMAL IN HERB GARDEN – PROBABLY SKUNK

    Opossum Track Rose Garden Colonial Park January 2015

    DETERMINED OPOSSUM

    When I beg you to do whatever you can to save wild New Jersey, on land and on water and in the air, I am NOT KIDDING!  Even though D&R Greenway has managed to save around 19,000 acres, folks, it is not enough.

    We didn’t find cranes.

    Our fear is that, next year at the time when their inner navigational systems compel them to that cornfield, it will have more $300,000+ dwellings and poor pitiful trees, and no nutrients for cranes!