PRINCETON MAGAZINE: POETRY and FLOWER MIRACLES

I wish I could block and copy the article for you, so you could see Andrew Wilkinson’s stunning floral images  However, my two poems from my own files are at the end.  May these bring you the seasonal joys for which we have all been pining!

http://www.princetonmagazine.com/category/features/featured-articles/  You may ‘paste this into your browser; scroll down to flowers and poetry.

Those of you who live in and near Princeton have seen the new issue of Princeton Magazine, hefty and glossy and impressive, one of Bob Hillier’s projects, along with Studio Hillier and that rich, ever expanding, ever teaching newspaper of our town — Town Topics.

It was a joy to open the issue with Ilene Dube’s magnificent Michael Graves story, and find that Linda Arntzenius, fellow poet, had seen to it that two of my poems appear in a glorious spread with flowers by Princeton-area florists.  Long ago, I knew Bob Hillier’s mother, who seemed to own all the flower shops we frequented in my earlier Princeton life.  This is a tribute to that impressive women.  It honors Poetry Month.  And I know four of the five poets — tremendous honor to be in their company, in those impressive poets.

The impeccable, imaginative floral art is by Andrew Wilkinson, one of our major D&R Greenway supporters on many fronts – and a spectacular fine art photographer.

The poets with whom I am privileged to share these luminous pages are Sharon Olson, Betty Lies, Vida Chu and Carolyn.

 

This took place at Island Beach in June:

IT ALL STARTED

 

when we came upon

carpets of stars

cranberries in flower

trembling white below

the ice blue sky

 

along the hard-packed dikes

slumbrous bees

formed golden pyramids

on gleaming amber boxes

 

dawn’s pollinators

here to burst all bonds

course among broad acres

of waving stamens

 

at day’s end we stood on tiptoe

plucking first blued berries

from among the mauve and pink

at the tips of overarching bushes

 

tucked among hollies and sheep laurel

through thickets and tunnels

we made our way to the sea

mouths awash in warm berries

 

DEFIANCE

 

I would be unruly

as these sprouting bulbs

 

surge and burgeon

though so slightly rooted

among the celadon stones

 

open swirls of hope

spurt voluminous white

spill gilded light

 

emitting spring as fragrance

even as winter

tightens his gelid grasp

 

CAROLYN FOOTE EDELMANN

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SNOWBOUND — REMEMBERING THE MARSH, — A Winter Walk

Not all winters tie one to the house!.  Some draw you outside, inexorably, delightedly.

Here are some rare but typical scenes of what used to be the Hamilton/Trenton/Bordentown Marsh, now the Abbott Marshlands.

Come wander with me, no matter the weather.  Come relish New Jersey’s wild beauty.

Marsh Weeds in Spring Lake

Marsh Weeds in Spring Lake

The Lake was purportedly named by Indians because formed by an ever-renewing spring.

Marsh Frozen Spring Lake Winter 2014

Spring Lake Mostly Frozen — But Life Exists Herein

Marsh First Willows 2013

The Wonder of Willows, Marsh

Marsh, Where Muskrats Ramble

Where Muskrats Ramble, Near Spring Lake

NJWILDBEAUTY Readers know I have an enormous need to see either New Jersey’s wild creatures, or evidence of their presence, or both.

Beaver Lodge, Marsh -- in winter, beaver keep waters open for rare ducks

Beaver Lodge, Marsh — in winter, beaver keep waters open for rare ducks

Beaver Fppd

Beaver Food

Goose Trails, Spring Lake

Goose Trails, Spring Lake

Marsh Sandy Damage 2013

Eponymous Beech Tree, Damaged by Hurricane Sandy

Fallen Trunk Decorated with Fungus, Marsh

Fallen Trunk Decorated with Fungus, Marsh

Turkey Tail Fungus on Felled Trunk, Marsh

Turkey Tail Fungus on Felled Trunk, Marsh

This winter walk was taken with Town Topics writer par excellence, Linda Arntzenius.  Sometimes the iced trail was so narrow that only one boot at a time could make its way.  Hardly ever could we walk side-by-side, but what beauty was ours!

And such silence!  Sacred soundlessness — how very rare in the modern world.

Beavers' Midnight Snack

Beavers’ Midnight Snack

Where Turtles Lurk and Thrive

Where Turtles Lurk and Thrive

In season, one learns to seek tiny dark triangles in spring lake, triangles that move right along, for they are the heads of the lake’s majestic turtles.  Sometimes, also, in the lake, snakes swim.

In winter, walkers can follow the straight trails of foxes, out for a stroll or a hunt, and discover the wing marks of rising birds in fresh snow on downed trunks.

To get to the Marsh, take Route 1 South into Trenton to the South Broad Street exit.  Drive as directed round the arena, and turn left/south onto Broad Street.  After Lalor, which angles only on your right, look for a church with two steeples, followed by a red light at Sewell Avenue.  Turn right onto Sewell and go about five blocks until the road Ts at the Marsh itself.  Drive through the gate and park near the lake. Usually, you will be welcomed by stately swans in all seasons.

To learn the Marsh, check out http://www.marsh-friends.org.  Get onto their e-mail mailing list for hikes with Ornithologist Charlie Leck, Botanist Mary Leck, and Mercer County Naturalist, Jenn Rogers.  In all seasons, these merry experts will introduce you to the creatures who thrive in New Jersey because individuals and groups such as D&R Greenway preserved this freshwater tidal wetlands.