TO SALEM AND CUMBERLAND COUNTIES

Maurice River Meander

Maurice River Meander

I don’t know about the rest of my NJWILDBEAUTY readers, but this one has had to cancel far more nature excursions than she’s taken in recent months.

Wild Weeds in Wild March Wind, Absecon Bay, Atlantic City

Wild Weeds in Wild March Wind, Absecon Bay, Atlantic City — What Greeted or Prevented Me, Most of This Year

With any luck, I’ll be down in Salem and Cumberland Counties, on the Delaware Bayshore, searching for spring above all, and birds — eagles everywhere — all day Sunday.

American Bald Eagle by Brenda Jones

American Bald Eagle by Brenda Jones

I’ll gather a few more scenes from other journeys, other seasons, to the wild and watery reaches of Salem and Cumberland.  With any luck, I’ll have new ones for you soon…

Salem Sail

Salem Sail

Salem Oak, Salem Town, Salem County

Salem Oak, Salem Town, Salem County

Lenni Lenape Grinding Tool in Greenwich, Salem County

Lenni Lenape Grinding Tool in Greenwich, Salem County

Alloways Creek near Hancock's Bridge, where British Massacred Sleeping Colonists in Hancock House

Alloways Creek near Hancock’s Bridge, where British Massacred Sleeping Colonists in Hancock House

Proud List of Tea Burners in Greenwich -- Our Own  Tea Party -- Descendants Still Live in Town

Proud List of Tea Burners in Greenwich — Our Own Tea Party — Descendants Still Live in Town

Majestic Facade, Historic Hancock House on Alloway Creek

Majestic Facade, Historic Hancock House on Alloway Creek

Alloway Creek in Peacetime

Alloway Creek in Peacetime

Bivalve Egret Lineup

Bivalve Egret Lineup

Bivalve Venerable/Vulnerable Building

Bivalve Venerable/Vulnerable Building

Conshohocken Specialty

Conshohocken Specialty

You can see, when we’re in Salem and Cumberland, driving down every road that says “NO EXIT”, for all roads lead to the Bay, “we are not in Kansas any more…”

Bateman's Live Crabs

Bateman’s Live Crabs

Delaware Bay Truck Painting

Delaware Bay Truck Painting

The reason these austere and pristine beauties, this historic sites, may still be experienced, is that humans work very hard to preserve them.  As NJWILDBEAUTY readers know, I spend the major portion of my life furthering preservation of New Jersey land.  Believe it or not, thought the Delaware Bay is very far from us, we are working very hard to preserve its waterways, marshes, meadows, farmlands and, above all [for me, and especially for our winged brethren], bird habitat.

Sun Shines on New Jersey – Thanksgiving Birding, 2014

On Thanksgiving Day, one of ‘The Intrepids’, Jeanette Hooban, and I chose many birds over one.

This seems radical to many.

Come along with us, and draw your own conclusions.

Entering 'The Brig' -- Lily Lake Road

Entering ‘The Brig’ — Lily Lake Road

It was snowing when we left Lawrenceville, –like the light, powdery beautiful flakes that swirl around in snow globes.  This was the scene as we drove Lily Lake Road off Route 9, below Smithville, at Oceanville.

Ducks to the Right of us, Ducks to Our Left

Ducks to the Right of us, Ducks to Our Left

Where Mergansers and Buffleheads Play

Where Mergansers and Buffleheads Play

The water to the left of the Brig’s entry bridge is where I saw my first truly wild mute swans, my first gadwall, and, this day, our major quests — hooded mergansers and their smaller look-alikes, buffleheads.  NJWILDBEAUTY readers know my camera doesn’t do well with birds.  So you’ll have to take our word for the fact that these black and white wonders are in this scene.

Leed's Eco-Trail Memorial 'Board'walk

Leed’s Eco-Trail Memorial ‘Board’walk

Water, Water Everywhere, Leeds Eco-Trail

Water, Water Everywhere, Leeds Eco-Trail

From the Leeds Eco-Trail, we watched a commanding great blue heron masterfully prowl his domain, successfully catching and swallowing more fish than we can count.  On the trail’s railing, a female belted kingfisher carried on in similar fashion.  A tardy osprey coasted above, lord of all he surveyed.  A massive and graceful female harrier patrolled the lower reaches.  We hadn’t even been in the Brig a quarter of an hour.

My Favorite Landscape, Preserved Wetlands

My Favorite Landscape, Preserved Wetlands

Great Blue Heron, Study in Alertness

Great Blue Heron, Study in Alertness

We took the all-too-short forested trail off Leeds Eco, which used to be complete all the way ’round, before sea-level rise, sustained too-high tides, all-too-frequent Nor’easters, full moon tides and hurricanes.

Lone Unknown Track, Forest Trail near Leeds Eco-

Lone Unknown Track, Forest Trail near Leeds Eco-

Sneak Boats with Rifles, off the Brig, in Absecon Bay

Sneak Boats with Rifles, off the Brig, in Absecon Bay

One of two sneakboats, a Tuckerton specialty of aeons ago, bristling with rifles, right off the refuge.  Atlantic City is behind this boat.  There was not a single bird, not even a gull, on this side of ‘The Brig.’  It is formally named the Edwin B. Forsythe Wildlife Refuge.

The birds were brilliant — hiding out on the opposite side.

Brant Hiding on North Side of Refuge, far from Sneakboats and Rifles and Death

Brant Hiding on North Side of Refuge, far from Sneakboats and Rifles and Death

The Dike Road Stretching East, toward Brigantine Island

The Dike Road Stretching East, toward Brigantine Island

This road was severely devoured by Hurricane Sandy, in two places.  It has been renewed, but with what I call Army Corps of Engineer Sand — a ghastly color, thick and coarse.  It is already washing away in clusters of runnels on two sides of the observation tower.  As though the sea, having once had its way with the Brig, is determined to return…

Inside the Refuge, we were also given one trumpeter swan – enormous wingspread, thoroughly black beak, no yellow lores; some tundra swans — smaller in wing, yellow lores, in a flock; and about a hundred snow geese, silent and grounded but thrilling.  This was one of those days when the entire beauty of the Refuge took us over, scene after scene.  The bird tally would not be kept.  The beauty tally is here.

We always go over to Scott’s Landing, near Leeds Point, after ‘Brigging’.  Here are some of the miracles of that stretch, part of Forsythe, but mostly accessible only by watercraft.

Nature's Artistry Scotts Landing Nov. 2014 015

Nature’s Artistry at Scott’s Landing

Dockside Grasses Scotts Landing Nov. 2014 016

Heaven and Haven for Waterflowl Scotts Landing Nov. 2014 017

Rail Central at Scott's Landing, though none on Thanksgiving

Rail Central at Scott’s Landing, though none on Thanksgiving

Jeanette Hooban Studies How to Shoot Ducks at Scotts Landing

Jeanette Hooban Studies How to Shoot Ducks at Scotts Landing

Tranquillity Base, Scotts Landing

Tranquillity Base, Scotts Landing

Scots Landing Timeless Waterways

Scots Landing Timeless Waterways

Last Rays Scotts Landing -- A Place Beyond Time

Last Rays Scotts Landing — A Place Beyond Time

Why Preserve

Why Preserve

Then we take a short, slow ride to Leeds Point, a true fishing village to this day.  Clams and crabs are the order of the day.  The Oyster Creek Inn, at this Point, knows how to cook fish and shellfish in the simple ancient ways, in a place that bustles in summer.  Not on Thanksgiving.

Sundown, Thanksgiving, Leeds Point

Sundown, Thanksgiving, Leeds Point

“Day is done, gone the sun…”

The moral of these pictures is, preserve every inch of open space in our beleaguered New Jersey, especially the watery inches!

Beginning NJWILDBEAUTY BLOG

Fisherman Island Beach

Fisherman Island Beach

Someone has to stand up for Mother Nature.  It’s not her fault that everywhere it is always storming.  It’s ours – for petrochemical greed.  But more of that later.  I start this new blog to stand up for Nature in New Jersey.

Although not a New Jersey Native, I have come to love this state for her natural beauty.  Since 2008, I have been blogging for the Princeton Packet — NJ WILD (which see).

Friends urge me to start my own blog, independently.  No better time than this to spread the news about our state.  We’re not called The Garden State for nothing.

Far beyond gardens is our remarkable wild beauty — especially in preserves we have been enlightened enough to form and maintain.

We are due to be the first state completely built-out, in a decade or two, according to a Rutgers Study.

In the meantime, places such as my own D&R Greenway Land Trust, are paying any price, bearing any burden to save New Jersey land, for farming, hiking, birding, photography and art, and yes, hunting and fishing.

We are the only state with three coastlines.  All of them beautiful, except where greed has punctured them with dikes and pipes and docks.  But we’re cleaning up our treasured Delaware River, so that shad literally run each spring, will run again, soon.

We’re removing dikes in vital marshlands, so that tides may course in and out as Nature always designed.  This allows native plants to thrive, and therefore birds and animals who evolved with these natives to prosper.

In the months ahead, I will remember earlier nature quests, and set off on new ones.  All of them with you in mind.

When I learn how to import my photographs, I’ll do that gleefully.  Meanwhile, you may see them by googling NJ WILD nature blog.

What I hope is that NJWILDBEAUTY will lure you to scenes of such peace and majesty, that you will forever distance yourself from the crowd who makes jokes about WHAT EXIT.  I venture to say, at every NJTPK exit, wildbeauty exists.  Come discover it with me.

Wild Grasses Island Beach Trail

High Water Nature Trail Island Beach