Christmas Arrives in Unexpected Settings

 Waterville Valley Vistas

When one has a difficult mother,  it can become essential to distance one’s self and  family, particularly at the time of significant holidays.  If one has a courageous husband, he may announce, as the parental car pulled out of our Princeton driveway after a particularly grueling visit, “That’s it.  We are not letting her ruin another Christmas.  We are going skiing at Waterville.”

My husband, Werner Oscar Joseph Edelmann (for full effect say with German accent) was 100% Swiss.  Although he had not grown up skiing, we took it up as a family, the year we moved to Princeton – 1968.  Shore friends, sitting on their dune-cushioned deck, insisted that our families learn together.  It was August and steamy.  Winter?  WHAT Winter.  We said yes.

I secretly hoped some disaster, like a broken leg, or death, would intervene before that crucial February challenge.  None did.  So we all began to learn to ski.  The girls were in kindergarten and first grade.  At Killington, they looked like bunnies in their fuzzy snowsuits and fat mittens, among a gaggle of other little beginners, huddled at the base of ‘the bunny slope.’

They, being half Swiss, did not remain beginners very long.  In the year of our deliverance from my mother, they were teens who preferred ‘bombing the black lines’   – the expert slopes.  Especially “Oblivion” in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire.  The White Mountains were Werner’s choice for our runaway Christmas, because their ski school and an authentic Swiss lodge were run by Paul Pfosi.  All Paul’s instructors were Swiss.  Extremely demanding.  “Ski marks on the inside of your ski boots” to prove you had your legs close enough together.  Off-slope, they all delighted to converse in their native (unwritten) language with this tall, dark-haired, dark-eyed very determined American skier.  Stein Eriksen in those years was our hero, our model.

stein_eriksen

No one would mistake us for Stein, but his example formed Pfosi’s Instructor Corps.

Anita Kathriner and Raphael Wyss make Alpkase, Mutschli and butter by hand in the traditional manner in a giant copper kettle over a wood burning fire at their cheese-making hut above Wengen, Switzerland

Swiss Copper Cheese Kettle in situ

Pfosi’s Lodge held the huge copper kettles we’d first seen in Emmenthaler, in which magnificent Swiss cheeses were precisely concocted.  Only Pfosi’s kettles overflowed with silky evergreen boughs from nearby endless forests.  Swiss Christmas music, such as relatives had carefully sent to Diane and Catherine over the years, pealed from hidden speakers.  Conditions were ideal on the slopes, and for any number of days we almost forgot it was Christmas.  But not quite.

Our family, over the years, had no experience of that Holiday beyond our own formal tree and hand-made-ornament tree, one by the living room fireplace, one by the family room’s slate hearth.  Heaven to us was a fire in each room, the three of us in long plaid skirts and white lace blouses, playing our guitars and caroling for Werner in the family room.  There’d always been the Nutcracker at Lincoln Center, and caroling in the neighborhood near Princeton’s Snowden Lane.  Could Christmas find us in New Hampshire?

There was a tiny church in the village below the lodge.  It felt very odd to go to church in ski clothes and apres-ski boots.  Instead of a jungle of poinsettias in the Princeton church, but two tiny ones ‘decked’ this austere altar.  Instead of instruments sustaining voices back home, a motley choir with cracking voices sang in a small wooden balcony high overhead.  But it was Midnight Mass, and it did hold all the magic we needed.  And the quivering voices underscored a somehow more memaningful reality.

We drove back up the mountain, past the restaurant where we’d had Christmas Eve Supper.  We’d sat next to a live birch tree, somehow able to live and thrive indoors, reaching for the midnight sky.  Between dinner and church, we’d been astounded by stars beyond counting, which seemed nearly blinding.  But between church and the lodge, no stars.  Instead, white swirls, glistening to be sure, of new snowflakes — no more welcome blessing in ski country at Christmas.

Swiss Santa in Boat

Back in our rooms — it must have been near 2 a.m. by now — we found dark Swiss chocolates wrapped in bright gold foil upon our pillows,.  Pfosi’s had signed lacy old-fashioned Christmas cards with gilt arabesques, such as those which arrived every year from Tante Li, Onkel Joni, Cousin Vera and the rest of the family in and near St. Gallen.  I cannot spell their Christmas message, but we all knew how to say it in Swiss — it sounded like FRO-LIKKA-VIE-NOCKTEN.  One said this with certain notes in our voices which the girls had heard since babyhood..

Frohlichi Wiehnacht Swiss Christmas Card

Diane’s and Catherine’s room was right across the narrow hall from ours.  They burst in, laughing all over.  “Come Quick!  Come Quick!  Carolers!”

We “thrust open the windows, threw up the sash” onto a scene I will never forget.  Snow circled, enfolding us as though we had been transported into the Milky Way. itself, Horses snorted and their visible breath mingled with the flakes.  Yes, sleigh bells jingled.  Tucked into hay in an old fashioned sleigh were male and female carolers, dressed as we had been for Mass, in ski parkas and ski mitts and knit hats.  These voices sounded like tiny silver chimes, like bells, rising into the heavens in celebration.

And we’d thought Christmas was only in our family room…

It wasn’t every Christmas morning that opened on a trail named “Oblivion”!

The Mountain, Waterville Valley

May each of you find your special holiday exactly as you need it this year — and may its real message of Peace on Earth, Good Will, suffuse our entire planet.

Here is an ad from the 1970’s, when we were there:

ski watervi w va NEW HAMPSHIRE PFOSI S LODGE Willkommen! Paul Pfosi, Director of the Waterville Valley Ski School, invites you to enjoy the Swiss-American hospitality of Pfosi’s Lodge. Alodge unique in every way combining old world charm with the most modern American accommodations and conveniences; …

The future would bring Christmas in other realms:

Aspen skiing scene,jpg

In Aspen, we could ski through forests.

In Zermatt, the Materhorn always tantalized:

Zermatt Materhorn from Internet

 

But the slopes held the magic:

 

Swiss skier from Internet

BUT NOTHING EVER TOPPED CAROLERS IN THE HORSE-DRAWN SLEIGH OUTSIDE THE OPEN WINDOWS OF PFOSI’S LODGE OF WATERVILLE.

OLD-FASHIONED ICE CREAM PARLOR, in Burlington NJ, near Delaware River

UMMM Ice Cream Burlington July 2017

NJWILDBEAUTY readers know I recently savored river towns, thanks to our brilliant light rail system from Bordentown (for me) to Camden.  This immaculate, zingy, Swiss-made train is reconnecting and resurrecting towns that died with the age of sail.

Coke of Yesteryear Ice Cream Parlor MMMM Burlington July 2017

Tickets are for a time period, not any particular destination – and mine (because of venerable age!) is 75 cents for two hours.  I guess non-venerables pay $1.50.  Heaven awaits.

CHOICES! Ice Cream Parlor MMMM Burlington

But also, the visceral experience of other eras.  I am convinced that Burlington’s brick sidewalks must have been made with bricks from the Abbott Marshlands, ages ago.  Signs of 1776 and 1656 abound.

Important Men Burlington July 2017

This ice cream parlor is in Burlington, (two blocks east and one south returned us to the train station, to buy and then validate a second set of tickets.)    It feels as though it were founded in the earliest part of the twentieth century, and has barely changed since.  Even I am not that venerable!

Eloquent Bricks Burlington

Back to the Ice Cream Parlor:

Get a Split Ice Cream Parlor Burlington July

 

FLAG Ice Cream Parlor MMMM Burlington July 2017

If Michelin had not invented “worthy of the journey”, I would have to do so for this idyllic sojourn.

On that hot summer’s day, all we needed to cool ourselves in the river towns, was to walk a block or two west to the river, or pop into this ice cream parlor.

O.K., the 21st-century waitress didn’t know how to make an ice cream soda.  But, beautiful and charming, she tore herself away from studying, to follow perfect instructions from my Princeton Photography Club (New York natives) companions.

Hit the rails — Think “River Line”!

 

 

 

 

REALITY – Joyeux Noel

NJWILDBEAUTY readers and all my friends know; and some powerfully share; my longing always to be in France in general, in Provence in particular.

Writing in my journal this morning, Christmas Eve, I discovered, “I wish it were 1987.”

Then, I was a resident of Cannes, although it was far easier to walk into Picasso’s Vallauris than to drive down into Cannes on those cooked-spaghetti roads.

The scene below does not take place in an unheated, unscreened, capacious apartment above the Mediterranean, while magenta rose laurier bloom in my garden.  There aren’t Alps out my kitchen window, frosted with first flakes.  There are no un-snowy pre-Alps processing beyond living room windows, wreathed with all those Corniches, leading from beloved France into redolent, resonant Italy.  There is neither the Esterel Forest nor the Esteril Massif (mountain range), — all coppery and russet and terra cotta and sometimes even magenta and claret and ruby; the turquoise sea frothing at their feet.  No, this is Lawrenceville, New Jersey.  It’s the home of a person who was only an expatriate for one year; but who thinks she was born that way, and will never recover.

The poster in the scene below celebrates an exhibit at Galerie La Licorne, (the Unicorn) in Juan-les-Pins.  My firstborn and I, back in 1981, were enthralled by it, in the lobby of the establishment of potters in that storied town.  Madoura are solely licensed to bring Picasso’s platters, plates and pitchers to life in the years after his death.

The Madoura staff watched that young girl reverently touch, study, absorb Pablo’s work throughout those bountiful rooms. Her hands, in the presence of Picasso’s ouevre, were as full of awe as a priest’s at his first mass, holding the Host.

Entranced from the first, we’d asked the owners if we might buy the poster (l’affiche.)  “No,” they instructed, “you’ll have to go to Juan-les-PIns.”  We explained that we’d been there only yesterday, and that we would fly home the following day.  We regretted together that a return to the Unicorn was not possible.

Ah, but the owners of Madoura Poterie were so impressed by Diane’s attention to the Master’s work, that they presented her with the rolled, beribboned poster, when we finally brought ourselves to leave.

santons-and-french-poster-and-ungerleiter-still-life-december-2016

Santons de Provence, the Large and the Small, in Lawrenceville, New Jersey

No that is not a Cezanne, nearer the viewer, needless to say.  It is a Bernard Ungerleiter (of Lambertville, New Jersey), our Cezanne.  I have two of his works in my dining room – the other of garlic.  I had been with his wife, Peg, as she bought the fat pale heads, as juicy as l’ail de Provence, at a Pennsylvania farm market in the early 1980’s.  Bernard wouldn’t let her cook with it – he had to paint it!

The large santons (terra cotta figures that accompany the manger scene in Provence) were bought by my Swiss husband for our family, in Vence or St. Paul-de-Vence, when the girls were 7 and 8 years old.  The tiny santons, –not garbed as are the older sets, are of plain terra cotta (terre cuite in France — cooked earth).  One is supposed to buy them at the smart art store on Rue d’Antibes in Cannes, then take them home to paint  I love the hues and textures of the roof-tiles of Provence.  When I can bring myself to arrange those santons each current Christmas, I am very glad not to have altered them in any way..

close-up-santons-december-2016

Close-Up of the Santons, and of Noel Provencal — which I re-read each December, savoring hearty rituals of the land I cherish, from the wheat of the feast of Saint Barbara to les treize (13!) desserts of this night of the birth of Le Nouveau-Ne

Why do I want this Christmas Eve to be 1987’s?  Because, then I’d be taking my French gifts, –bought in the Nice Vieux Ville (Old Towne)– across the way in the dark to the tower where my young neighbors lived:  L’Observatoire… 

We’d had so much fun exploring together, since my late autumn arrival.  Even though everyone back home had said, “You’re going to be so lonely.  They will never invite you into their homes!”  Wrong.

santon-de-provence-herdsman

Santon de Provence, Shepherd’s Cape

Jeanette et Didier and their little ones  wanted me with them for Christmas Eve supper next to their real tree, abundant with home-made ornaments.  They wanted me to share gift-opening with their family.  But the heart of the matter would be Midnight Mass (La Messe de Minuit) in Le Suquet.  This is the oldest part of Cannes, its barely known rocky promontory.  It served as a major watch site for hundreds of years and conflicts, dating back to Phonecians and Saracens. .

Our normal French Christmas Eve supper was nothing less than canard a la orange and frites’ and o, my, such slender, savory golden turnips!  Jeanette had tossed it all together without any fuss, the way my Michigan mother had made meat loaf and baked potatoes.

My gifts of large comic books (Tin-Tin — the French never lose their taste for comic strips) for the children, and candied fruits from the legendary Confiserie Auer near Nice’s Place Massena, were enormous successes.  I was one with this family, wrapped in their fondness, uplifted by their merriment.

These qualities have been in pretty short supply ever since.  Some who know me; and some who read my blogs; realize that I work very hard to survive Christmas every year, deprived as I am of my own family.

Usually, I ‘run away’.  Last year, I fled to Cape May, and often to the Brigantine. I pretend that birding the day away is all that matters.  I never did this with my lost daughters because I didn’t know any interesting birds in those days.

santons-large-and-small-december-2016

The Basket-Weaver and the Garlic-Braider observe Le Nouveau-Ne

Midnight Mass in Cannes was spoken and sung in three languages:  Latin, English and Provencal!  I knew two, but not three.  It was a thrill to hear the old songs in all tongues, and be able to sing some, even remembering Latin.

How I marveled to hear the gospel begin, “Dans le temps de Cesar Auguste.”   Indeed.  The very day before, I had spent in Frejus, favorite town of Augustus Caesar.  I’d found his port, his forum, his theatre, and something called La Lanterne d’Auguste — a species of lighthouse.  I’d feasted on rare lamb and Salade Antiboise across from that forum, writing feverish poems about the sense of ancient bullfights suffusing me near the ancient chutes through which animals had exploded innto the sawdust arena.

This is not the first time I’ve said, “Call me a dreamer; well, maybe I am…”   But when the French priest spoke those words of the emperor in whose footsteps I’d trod all the previous day, I suddenly realized the bible was real!  I didn’t know I didn’t know that until the holy night alongside my dear new friends of Cannes.

santon-de-provence1

Traditional Santons de Provence, in hand-made costumes

The Mass was enlivened with living santons.  Women and men and children of the village had practiced for months for these few moments of procession and recession (which had NO economic tinge in that place!)  They wore the noble costumes of ancient times, in this region that has never fully been assimilated into France itself!  Accurate down to the lace on their petticoats, and the heft of sabots (like Dutch wooden shoes) of other eras, making a venerable sound of hollowness on the church’s marble floor.

Shepherds in flowing cloaks, the hue of camels, demonstrated why their hefty garb had the extra fabric on the shoulders.  They carried real lambs and real kids, on those capelets, to be blessed by the priest and to honor the Infant, Le Nouveau-Ne, the Newborn.

Others bore grapes; demijohns of wine; clear glass globules of golden olive oil.  The oldest women preceded the parents of the newest babe, these honorary grandmothers presenting layettes freshly made for this precious human child.  The young ones knelt and placed their infant in straw in a manger at the foot of the altar.

Then, all who carried the season’s fruits, alive and otherwise, recessed to the enormous terra cotta creche (Nativity Scene) on a far wall.  High in the back, where mountains loomed, the Three Kings and their servants (one of whom, Balthazar, is said to have founded nearby Les Baux) moved in stately array, ponderous and elegant as any wedding in Westminster Abbey.  Epiphany would have to wait until January the 6th, but the royal ones were already en route, following the star.

img_2021

Portrait of my Daughters by V. Durbin Thibodeau, Artist-in-Residence of the Sacred Heart School of Grosse Point, Michigan

1987 was the year in which my daughters were taken.  I realized this fully at the time of my fiftieth birthday.  Standing on my luminous balcony, overlooking the midnight-blue-black Mediterranean, I watched stars wink on high.  They seemed to fall right into my shallow champagne glass, joining tears.

But Christmas Eve, 1987, for those few hours with friends in the tiny stony church of Le Suqauet, beloved traditions in my favorite favorite region of my favorite land, washed over me, banishing grief.

It became clear that night, and I must return to this certainty every year.  My loss was as nothing, compared to what had happened “dans le temps de Cesar Auguste,” in a time in the world when Peace ruled.

santon-de-provence-la-lavandiere

La lavandiere, Provencal Santon

Tonight, many will follow La Messe de Minuit in tiny churches all over the South of France.  When they eat their ‘meagre supper’ (meatless), it will be followed by les treize desserts.   At a certain time during the family gathering, the eldest will lead and the youngest grace the rear of the family parade in to the Yule Log.  Vin cuit, cooked wine, will be sprinkled onto this hefty log, chosen just that afternoon for the purposes.  A prayer will be said, hearthside.  I wish it for all of you:

“Next year, if we are not more, may we at least, not be fewer.”

santon-de-provence-bread-baker

Santon – Bread-Maker:  [ALL SANTONS CLOSE-UPS ARE FROM INTERNET)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HAGLEY MUSEUM AND GROUNDS, IDEAL FAMILY HOLIDAY DESTINATION

Who would think that a trip to an industrial shrine would be a quintessential Holiday journey, as well as a resplendent farewell to Autumn?  Let alone that seemingly endless beauty awaits in this shrine to the duPont’s black powder industry?

Autumn and Relic of Black Powder's Heyday

Autumn and Relic of Black Powder’s Heyday

I made two trips with friends to the Hagley Museum and Library, near Wilmington Delaware, in another November.  The vibrancy of Hagley resounds within me to this day.

Mellow Fruitfulness

Mellow Fruitfulness

I decided to work with these pictures as though hanging Hagley ornaments on a tree for NJWILDBEAUTY readers.  This treasure-site also possesses a fascinating gift shop, rich in items of surpassing beauty, as well as books and other sources of information on this part of America’s industrial heritage.

Hagley's Narrow-Guage Railroad to carry the black powder

Hagley’s Narrow-Guage Railroad to carry the black powder

French who fled the Revolution and its aftermath came to the banks of the Brandywine River, to generate uniformly milled powder for guns in our young nation.

Morning Light on Hagley Building

Morning Light on Hagley Building

I’m not going to tell the story, for they do it all so brilliantly there.

Essence of Hagley Power and Endurance

Essence of Hagley Power and Endurance

Industrial buildings and tools come to life with genial demonstrations.

Essential Water Wheel, bringing smooth-flowing Brandywine River to Mill the Powder

Essential Water Wheel, bringing smooth-flowing Brandywine River to Mill the Powder

Solidity of Hadley Construction

Solidity of Hadley Construction

If Locks Could Speak

If Locks Could Speak

Legacy of the Stonemasons

Legacy of the Stonemasons

The intricacy and beauty, to say nothing of profound durability of the stonework, astounds at every turn.  This would be a geologist’s paradise.

Power Source

Power Source

The mansion sings of three centuries on three levels.and in its gardens.

Hagley's Mansion, which replicates three centuries of duPont inhabitation

Hagley’s Mansion, which replicates three centuries of duPont inhabitation

Hagley Mansion Garlanded For Christmas as it would have been in the time of the duPonts

Hagley Mansion Garlanded For Christmas as it would have been in the time of the duPonts

Oak Leaf Hydrangea at Peak, Hagley Garden

Oak Leaf Hydrangea at Peak, Hagley Garden

Hagley Pumpkins in late light

Hagley Pumpkins in late light

Mansion and November Skies

Mansion and November Skies

Hagley's Restored Garden in November

Hagley’s Restored Garden in November

View from the Mansion, Carefully Sited on Hill to be Far from (frequent) Black Powder Explosions

View from the Mansion, Carefully Sited on Hill to be Far from (frequent) Black Powder Explosions

Brandywine Bridge

Brandywine Bridge

Brandywine Falls

Brandywine Falls

Typical Handsome Hagley Structure

Typical Handsome Hagley Structure

Built for the Ages

Built for the Ages

Late Light on Black Powder Building

Late Light on Black Powder Building

Majestic Structure, Quintessential River

Majestic Structure, Quintessential River

Tracks of Yesteryear

Tracks of Yesteryear

Still Handsome After All These Years

Still Handsome After All These Years

Venerable Wall, Black Powder Building

Venerable Wall, Black Powder Building

Fall and the River

Fall and the River

Just Fallen Oak Leaves

Just Fallen Oak Leaves

Industrial Nobility

Industrial Nobility

One Leaf of Majestic Tree -- I think Sycamore

One Leaf of Majestic Tree — I think Sycamore

Hurtling Brandywine, Impermeable Black Powder Building

Hurtling Brandywine, Impermeable Black Powder Building

Yesterday's Power

Yesterday’s Power

Stone In the Service of Black Powder -- reminding me of an altar...

Stone In the Service of Black Powder — reminding me of an altar…

Stone Masterpiece

Stone Masterpiece

Stone Mondrian

Stone Mondrian

Stone Wall with Moss and Fresh-fallen Leaves

Stone Wall with Moss and Fresh-fallen Leaves

Majestic Wall

Majestic Wall

The Past Speaks

The Past Speaks

Yellow Boxcar of Narrow-Gauge Railway

Yellow Boxcar of Narrow-Gauge Railway

The excursion is best when you take their bus to the top and stroll down, with leisure unknown to the men who ground the black powder, so essential to our young nation.

Strolling Hagley

Strolling Hagley

Hagley Entry Building with Wreath

Hagley Entry Building with Wreath

 Hagley is worthy of the journey for the serene privilege of strolling along the Brandywine alone.

Brandywine Serenity

Brandywine Serenity

November Rose and Brandywine

November Rose and Brandywine

Hagley Wreath in the Style of the DuPonts

Hagley Wreath in the Style of the DuPonts

 

Hagley is located in Greenville, Delaware 19807, about four miles from downtown Wilmington, 30 minutes south of Philadelphia, 90 minutes north of Baltimore, and two hours south of New York City.

GPS Addresses

Museum: 200 Hagley Creek Road, Wilmington, DE 19807

(Please note that many GPS devices and Map Quest will guide you to Hagley’s administrative entrance rather than the museum entrance.  If you find yourself approaching Hagley’s entrance and you go over a speed bump, you’re in the wrong place!  See below for directions from the administrative entrance to the museum entrance.)

Click here for directions to the Museum via Google Maps.

Library, Soda House, and Administration buildings: 298 Buck Road, Wilmington, DE 19807. Click here for directions to the Hagley Library, Soda House, and Administration buildings

Driving Directions to Museum

From the North: Take I-95 South to exit 8B (Rt. 202 Concord Pike/Wilmington); follow approximately one mile to DE RT 141; turn LEFT onto 141 South; at the second light, you must turn RIGHT to stay on 141 South, follow for approximately 2 miles; at the bottom of a long hill, you must turn RIGHT again to stay on 141 South; after crossing bridge watch for Hagley entrance sign on right; make a sharp RIGHT at Hagley sign onto Old Barley Mill Road; the museum entrance is at the bottom of the hill on the LEFT.

From the South: Take I-95 North to Delaware exit 5B (Newport) onto DE RT 141; follow north for 7 miles;  cross through large intersection of RT 141 and RT 100; take next LEFT onto Old Barley Mill Road; the museum entrance is at the bottom of the hill on the LEFT.

If you miss the turn onto Old Barley Mill Road and cross a large bridge and find yourself at the entrance to the DuPont Experimental Station, turn RIGHT at the light, cross an iron truss bridge, turn RIGHT again and follow the river to Hagley’s entrance.

From East (Wilmington): Take RT 52/12th Street NORTH; stay RIGHT when crossing over I-95; 12th Street turns into Pennsylvania Avenue; continue for two miles to Rising Sun Lane, turn RIGHT; at bottom of hill (at River) turn LEFT on to Main Street; follow the river to Hagley’s entrance (about ½ mile)

From West (Longwood Gardens):  Exit Longwood Gardens onto Rt 1 North; follow about ½ mile to Rt 52 S/Kennett Pike, turn RIGHT onto Rt 52; follow 9 miles to Breck’s Lane, turn LEFT onto Brecks Lane; follow to bottom of the hill (the river), turn LEFT onto Main Street; follow river about ½ mile to Hagley’s entrance.

From Library/Administrative Entrance to Museum Entrance: Exit straight out gates and follow to first traffic light (Rt 100), turn LEFT; follow to next traffic light (Rt 141) turn LEFT;  take NEXT LEFT onto Old Barley Mill Road; follow to bottom of the hill; Hagley’s entrance will be on the LEFT.